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Showing 82 research statements.

ERM - Institutionalizing ERM: Learning from International Practice

Research Candidate Statement

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Description

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Background

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Literature Search Summary

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Objectives

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Urgency and Potential Benefits

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Primary Author

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Implementation Considerations

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Notes

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CC - Enhancing executive awareness and understanding of TPM

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

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Description

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Background

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Literature Search Summary

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Objectives

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Urgency and Potential Benefits

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Primary Author

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Implementation Considerations

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Notes

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CC - Supporting the discipline of data-driven decision making

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

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Description

Research to improve DOTs capability and capacity for data-driven decision making.


Background

Research to improve DOTs capability and capacity for data-driven decision making.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

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Primary Author

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Implementation Considerations

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Notes

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CC - Advancing the discipline of data-driven decision making within State DOTs

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

Research to advance the discipline of data-driven decision making within State DOTs


Literature Search Summary

NCHRP Project 23-27 Strategies to Strengthen Data-Driven Decision Making Details here.


Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

CC - Performance Measure Dictionary and Technical Guidance

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This research would produce an updated guidebook of current and emerging performance
measures used and for use by State DOTs.
NCHRP 20-24(37)G – Technical Guidance for
Deploying National Level Performance Measurements
was completed in 2011. This project
would update this valuable guidance.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

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Notes

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CC - Advanced Analytics – Using Big Data for Performance-Based Investment

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

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Objectives

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Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

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Notes

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SMET - Acquiring Better Data (Private Sector, Third Party, Fused Datasets)

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

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Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

  • Seek better data from the private sector and third parties, and fuse this data with DOT data to generate new comparisons and insights.
  • Collect and develop datasets for mobility and traffic.
  • Explore the availability of new datasets and identify ways to use datasets with DOT data for calibration of QA/QC.
  • Compare the scope, availability, reliability, and accuracy of privately available transportation mobility and traffic datasets sold by companies such as INRIX, Teralytics, Streetlight, etc.
  • Update and improve data definitions, especially for traffic. (State DOTs often measure traffic in discrete measures like AADT, but people are increasingly using a blend of modes to move from origin to destination, and traffic data should reflect that.)

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

SMET - Synthesis: Data Gathering & Data Sharing Agreements to Monetize DOT Data

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

  • Understand state DOTs' rules governing their data sharing agreements and intellectual property
  • Explore agency methods and examples for monetizing data
  • Identify what IP exists for sharing and selling data
  • Find and highlight best-practices in multi-state data agreements
  • Understand what agencies and organizations are doing to support their data sharing agreements
  • Recognize what data should be collected, sought, and shared

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

SMET - Determine the role of data to ensure equitable deployments of AVs and shared mobility within communities.

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Create a best practices guide for using data to inform equitable deployments of AVs and shared mobility.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

  • Identify the best locations for AV deployment which would deliver equity for all communities
  • Understand the elements of equity surrounding AV and shared mobility deployment

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

ERM - Guide for effectively linking Performance Measures, Risk Management, and Process Improvement 

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Great research has been done to help integrate Asset Management, Performance Management and Risk Management (NCHRP 08-113) and for implementing Enterprise Risk Management (NCHRP 20-24(105)). Agencies often have programs (performance management, Risk management, and process improvement) that operate separately but are linked rather linearly. Performance management shows where we’ve been, Risk management highlights what would inhibit us from achieving a desired future, and process improvement links well to development of mitigation measures. In the vein of the above-mentioned research, a guide to step from one area to another would make these programs more effective and linked within the agency.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Highlight effective practices in each discipline (PM, RM, PI) and develop a guide to link the programs (including best practices).


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

ERM - Improving Risk Visualization and Communication Internally and Externally 

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

The ability to effectively communicate risks both within an agency and externally to key stakeholders is important in decision-making and assuring effective mitigation strategies are assigned and appropriate resources are dedicated. Risk management is an effective tool for decision-making but communicating risks, potential impacts and likelihood of occurrence as well as appropriate mitigation is often not well understood.

This proposal builds off of a similar RPS developed as part of NCHRP 20-123(04) but adds in and emphasizes the element of visualization to improve communication. It also emphasizes the concept of risk tolerance.  


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Develop guidance for crafting an effective risk management communication strategy with materials (i.e.., metrics, dashboards, regular reports) with a clear explanation of uncertainty, risk tolerance, and associated risk mitigation strategies. 


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

ERM - Developing New Performance Metrics for Risk Management 

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Risk management metrics are needed to be able to determine the effectiveness of risk management strategies and programs. 


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Develop tools and strategies to measure the effectiveness of risk management processes in order to determine what works well. 


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

ERM - Improving Responsible Risk-Taking Perception in Transportation Agencies  

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Need to understand and demonstrate risk-tolerance associated with decision-making within agencies. This relates to both potential threats and opportunities. 

This proposal builds on the draft problem statement outlined in the NCHRP 20-123(04). The background has been acceptably defined. The objectives should be modified to further emphasize risk perception and development of ways to assess and communicate risk tolerance.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Emphasis on developing tools and methodologies to document risk tolerance and acceptance parameters associated with taking risks. 


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

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Implementation Considerations

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Notes

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OM - Organizational culture and focus to better meet resiliency

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Organizational culture and focus to better meet resiliency...maintenance... usage.... supply chain... climate change... (AM group has a similar topic on the shift to operational focus)


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

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Objectives

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Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

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Notes

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CC - Determine the appropriate level of overhead expenditures for managing new grant programs to prevent fraud and mismanagement, while maximizing public benefit

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Both federal and recipient agencies have the goal of maximizing the public benefits from investment of the limited transportation funding. Additionally, there is a cost and/or risk to every activity or inaction related to program delivery. Whenever an available dollar is moved from physical or operational improvements on the system to program administration, the public loses the benefit of that dollar. Similarly, every dollar that is lost from the system because of fraud or diverted away from the program goals due to whatever form of mismanagement, the public loses the intended benefit of that dollar. Therefore, the goal of all agencies should be to minimize the negative risks and costs associated with administering the funding programs, even if that means the occasional dollar is lost to fraud or mismanagement when the cost to prevent that loss is greater than the cost of the loss itself. It seems especially important to avoid duplicative administrative costs generated from the various governmental levels. The essential issue is determining the end-user public return on investment (ROI) from adding program requirements for both the federal agency and the recipient agency.


Background

Both federal and recipient agencies have the goal of maximizing the public benefits from investment of the limited transportation funding. Additionally, there is a cost and/or risk to every activity or inaction related to program delivery. Whenever an available dollar is moved from physical or operational improvements on the system to program administration, the public loses the benefit of that dollar. Similarly, every dollar that is lost from the system because of fraud or diverted away from the program goals due to whatever form of mismanagement, the public loses the intended benefit of that dollar. Therefore, the goal of all agencies should be to minimize the negative risks and costs associated with administering the funding programs, even if that means the occasional dollar is lost to fraud or mismanagement when the cost to prevent that loss is greater than the cost of the loss itself. It seems especially important to avoid duplicative administrative costs generated from the various governmental levels. The essential issue is determining the end-user public return on investment (ROI) from adding program requirements for both the federal agency and the recipient agency.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Develop a means of determining the balance between program requirements that minimize the risks of fraud and/or of not meeting program goals with maximizing the benefits to the end users (i.e., the public).


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

EM - How to use locally developed measures to tell a national story

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

In many cases, states and other local government agencies have performance measures developed through the extensive public outreach involved in the various strategic planning efforts. For example, freight mobility in an urban area often means travel-time vs. in a rural area is means the system’s ability to carry the desired loads (i.e., height, width, and load restrictions not meeting expectations). In either case, the end results are wasted time and fuel and more GHG emissions. By definition, these local measures are important to the end users of the transportation system, because of how they were developed through public input.

(freight issues (system constraint), system condition, resiliency)


Background

In many cases, states and other local government agencies have performance measures developed through the extensive public outreach involved in the various strategic planning efforts. For example, freight mobility in an urban area often means travel-time vs. in a rural area it means the system’s ability to carry the desired loads (i.e., height, width, and load restrictions not meeting expectations). In either case, the end results are wasted time and fuel and more GHG emissions.

By definition, these local measures are important to the end users of the transportation system, because of how they were developed through public input. Therefore, local policymakers often want or require these measures to be used in the decision processes and to tell the local story. From a local agency viewpoint, it would be ideal if these measures could also be used to tell the national story. This would avoid potentially conflicting stories between local and national measures and would avoid the duplicate work of collecting, monitoring, and analyzing similar measures related to the same basic goal.


Literature Search Summary

NCHRP 20-24(37)L - National Report on Transportation System Performance -- State DOTs Telling the Story https://apps.trb.org/cmsfeed/TRBNetProjectDisplay.asp?ProjectID=3321


Objectives

Develop a means of consolidating the many related local measures into a national measure that describes and monitors the national transportation system’s ability to meet the traveling public’s needs.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

EM - Synthesis: Cross-measure resource allocation

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Transportation organizations need to make resource allocation decisions for multiple service areas. Examples include Assets (pavements, bridges, etc.); Operations (snow and ice control, traffic) and Quality of Life benefits (Safety, Accessibility, Equity). Can some of the tools used for cross asset resource allocation be expanded to include services and quality of life?  

Bringing in safety, snow and ice control, etc. (ND has a tradeoff hub to do this)


Background

Transportation agencies make resource allocation decisions for multiple service areas, and the impacts of these decisions are often captured with performance measures. Condition measures for physical asset classes pavements, bridges, etc.; performance measures for system operations (snow and ice control, traffic operations, emergency response) and quality of life measures (safety, accessibility, equity) are used by agencies to evaluate these resource allocations. State agencies generally have flexibility to adjust the level of investment of these categories, yet evaluation of the tradeoffs or optimization of these decisions are often limited to similar measures (e.g. asset measures bridge condition vs pavement condition). There is potential benefit in expanding the scope of these analyses to include performance measures and investment classes of less similar nature. What are the practices and tools used for cross asset resource allocation used by state agencies that include services and quality of life investments?


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

  • Investigate, compile, and categorize examples of organizations’ efforts of using performance measures and data supported practices and tools for cross resource allocation and goal-oriented decisions.
  • Develop methodology to capture qualitative descriptions of performance.
  • Develop a framework to address resource allocation between capital and maintenance decisions (e.g. traffic operations, snow & ice vs physical assets).

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

OM - Managing Workforce Changes and Availability

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Transportation agencies traditionally had a very steady workforce. The combination of changes in young people’s work patterns and the economic changes that drive workforce availability requires that agencies need to act more proactively on how to deliver transportation programs. Research is needed to understand the behavioral patterns and mechanisms to both mitigate variability in workforce availability and what can be done proactively to benefit the agency.

With the increased funding states are receiving based on the IIJA and BFP. One agency has identified the fact that they may run into contractor availability to meet the needs of the upcoming projects.

Changes in economy. Changes in young people's work styles. With IIJA money, how are agencies going to be able to spend it, manage it? NMDOT is getting $45M for bridge projects, they have to identify the projects and it will strain the workforce to meet the requirements.


Background

Transportation agencies traditionally had a very steady workforce. The combination of changes in young people’s work patterns and the economic changes that drive workforce availability requires that agencies need to act more proactively on how to deliver transportation programs. Research is needed to understand the behavioral patterns and mechanisms to both mitigate variability in workforce availability and what can be done proactively to benefit the agency.

With the increased funding states are receiving based on the IIJA and BFP. NMDOT has identified the fact that we may run into contractor availability to meet the needs of the upcoming projects.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

  • Understand changes in transportation workforce behavior
  • Understand the economic forces that change transportation workforce behavior
  • Determine ways that transportation agencies can better manage with these forces
  • Recommend steps that agencies can take to work within these forces

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

OM - Synthesis: Effectiveness of Process Improvements

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Several states have established offices to implement continuous improvement processes such as Lean, Design Thinking, or Change Management. Over 30 of these offices participate in the Transportation Lean Forum (TLF), an informal group that operates in association with the AASHTO Subcommittee on Organization Management. In addition to formal offices, some states make less formal “grass roots” efforts to improve their processes. A synthesis would conduct a side-by-side study of the states’ efforts, including efforts in states that are not participating in the TLF, find what is working and what is not, assist states to identify improvements that they might implement, and set a baseline of the current “state of the art” that could inform future research on the outcomes of these efforts.


Background

Several states have established offices to implement continuous improvement processes such as Lean, Design Thinking, or Change Management. Over 30 of these offices participate in the Transportation Lean Forum (TLF), an informal group that operates in association with the AASHTO Subcommittee on Organization Management. In addition to formal offices, some states make less formal “grass roots” efforts to improve their processes. A synthesis would conduct a side-by-side study of the states’ efforts, including efforts in states that are not participating in the TLF, find what is working and what is not, assist states to identify improvements that they might implement, and set a baseline of the current “state of the art” that could inform future research on the outcomes of these efforts.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Lean Improvement research questions:

  1. Are there other states and countries with Lean Improvement or similar offices?
  2. In what types of work are they achieving success?
  3. Are there difference in focus between the DOTs?
  4. Are there lessons to be learned by DOTs about how they might best improve their improvement efforts? (e.g., the Lean effort in England focuses mainly on the application of Lean principles in construction, but US States have not yet adopted Lean Construction to any great extent.)

Efficiency research questions:

  1. Are there other states and countries with efficiency reporting requirements?
  2. How do the reported efficiencies compare?
  3. Are there types of efficiency that are reported in some states but not others?
  4. Are there lessons to be learned by DOTs about how they might best improve their efficiency?

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

EM - Measurement of non-traditional performance metrics for a more comprehensive characterization of performance and societal impact

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

We want to achieve societal goals/quality of life and create public value. How do we measure this? Can the current emerging measures be utilized (e.g. accessibility, equity, resilience)? How about internal agency goals and measures? Measuring internal agency and non-traditional transportation areas would help show the achievement we want. This could/would include internal workforce and diversity measures but also non-traditional things out in the world, on/for the transportation system. How can we measure the public value created that is more expanded than just transportation benefits?


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The public, society at large, is demanding that we consider impacts and performance in a range of dimensions that state DOTs have not traditionally focused on. This is likely to require non-traditional performance measures to capture the impacts of the system we deliver on those performance dimensions.

  • Measuring the public value of transportation initiatives (I.e., education reduces crime). Utah is working on measuring the quality of life. 
  • Identify new measures to address arising areas of importance such as accessibility, resilience, and equity.
  • Includes developing new measures and using measures that exist but transportation has less experience with.
  • Seek to represent non-traditional goals in the decision-making process
  • Connect with the broader societal goals that the public really wants to achieve.
  • Additional new measurement areas include: resiliency, maintenance, usage, supply chain, and climate change.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

CC – Measuring the public value and wider societal benefits created by transportation investments

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

Performance measurement and performance-based management have a long history in state DOTs as a discipline to track progress toward goals and optimize resource decisions. However, transportation agency goals are evolving from a pure operational focus to a focus on broad societal goals and creating value for the public. The value created by transportation investments spans not only transportation but also education, human services, land use, environment, and economy. A broader view of value and methods are needed to account for not only quantifiable value but also qualitative value. Another challenge is time horizons - how to value and manage investments today to deliver benefits in the much longer term. This research would develop and test measures of wider societal benefits deriving from the delivery of transportation investments.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

TAM - Management system treatments vs. Projects

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

How to define pavement management sections. What gets included? What happens to the assets that we don’t decide to treat as part of a project?


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

TAM - Synthesis: Current state of resilience work 

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

All states are taking on resiliency in their asset management plans this year, and there are additional resilience-focused programs available from FHWA.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

  • Explore current state of practice to establish a baseline.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

TAM - Best practices managing miscellaneous assets

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

Miscellaneous assets are secondary highway assets (not roadway or bridge), such as small culverts, highway lighting, retaining walls, etc. Formerly these assets were dealt with while doing major pavement/bridge projects. As those projects have become more “focused”, we need systematic approaches to managing those miscellaneous assets in their own program/projects. What is the right life cycle approach for these kinds of assets? There is a cost to collect, inspect, and manage inventories of these assets. For some assets, it may not make sense to track at all, and just replace as the asset reaches the end of its life.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Determine how to best manage miscellaneous assets, and to what level.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

TAM - AI asset inventory and condition extraction to keep data up to date

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

NCHRP 23-16: Implementing and Leveraging Machine Learning at State Departments of Transportation: Available here.


Objectives

Emerging technologies hold the promise of transforming asset data collection for transportation asset management such as the use of drones for inspections, LiDAR field data collection, continuous monitoring of real-time sensor data, and more. While the technology has been transforming, MAP-21 and the Fast Act jump started at many agencies in attaining an inventory of infrastructure assets and transportation data. At the same time, accessibility and affordability to collect high volumes of asset inventory data, such as LiDAR point cloud data, present the problem of how agencies can visualize and manage such large amounts of data and integrate the many layers for each transportation asset management plan. Now that the need for such data is federally recognized, further research is needed to understand what the latest technologies for asset analysis can offer an agency as well as how frequently that information needs generated.

Research is needed in the following areas:

  • Address the adoption and practical application of these technologies and the rapid pace of technological advancement.
  • What level of extraction detail and frequency interval is needed to support TAM at both the state and local levels and how can the condition assessment be applied to the performance measures of both pavement and non-pavement assets?
  • Further investigate what tools are capable of visualizing asset extraction layers, as well as presenting such data to all stakeholders in powerful GIS formats with standardized TAM graphics for universal interpretation.
  • As the accuracy of techniques such as mobile LiDAR improves, the ability of traditional asset management data begins to converge with the accuracy needed for engineering purposes such as design and construction. If asset data at the network level becomes sufficiently accurate redundant data collection can be eliminated. The research should consider any refinements that would need to occur in network level asset management data collection to make the data useful for compliance (i.e. ADA), safety (i.e. bridge clearances) or engineering purposes.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

TAM - Reorganizing DOT around Asset Management and TSMO 

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Reimagine the DOT Organizational and Decision Making Paradigm from - one that is driven by planning, design and construction – to one driven by the need to maintain and operate an established system based on principles of asset management and transportation system operations


Background

Reimagine the DOT Organizational and Decision Making Paradigm from - one that is driven by planning, design and construction – to one driven by the need to maintain and operate an established system based on principles of asset management and transportation system operations


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

To rethink how a transportation agency should be organized to maintain and operate an existing system in real time. That includes a focus on preservation and maintenance of existing assets, responding quickly and effectively to incidents and emergencies, and operating the system at an optimized level of service given funding constraints. The research will consider what systems and processes need to be in place to monitor conditions and operations, the role of maintenance and asset management in programming and project development, effective use of agency forces, budgeting for maintenance and replacement over the lifecycle, and how to manage risk as a compliment to resource constrained asset management strategies. The research will look at various public and private sector models that look at organizational structure, element driven contracting, funding allocation models, and the role of in house vs contract resources to maximize the cost effectiveness of resource investments.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

ERM - Assessing Financial Risk at the Program and Enterprise Levels

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$450,000

Research Period

18-24 months

Description

Financial risks can threaten the strategic objectives of transportation agencies - e.g., the safe and reliable and efficient movement of people and goods. For example, the Highway Trust Fund is tied to taxes on gas and diesel. However, the recent COVID-19 pandemic greatly reduced American consumption, thus dramatically reducing revenues. State DOTs have seen their budgets slashed by 30% or more, forcing delays in some projects. Furthermore, external mandates can impose both risks and opportunites. A well-funded mandate could mean state DOTs have additional funding for enhancing resilience, while an unfunded mandate could force a DOT to choose between maintenance and projects. The objective of this project is to help transportation leaders with decision-making tools for allocating limited resources when subjected to unpredicatable financial conditions.


Background

Financial risks can threaten the strategic objectives of transportation agencies - e.g., the safe and reliable and efficient movement of people and goods. For example, the Highway Trust Fund is tied to taxes on gas and diesel. However, the recent COVID-19 pandemic greatly reduced American consumption, thus dramatically reducing revenues. State DOTs have seen their budgets slashed by 30% or more, forcing delays in some projects. Furthermore, external mandates can impose both risks and opportunites. A well-funded mandate could mean state DOTs have additional funding for enhancing resilience, while an unfunded mandate could force a DOT to choose between maintenance and projects. The objective of this project is to help transportation leaders with decision-making tools for allocating limited resources when subjected to unpredicatable financial conditions.


Literature Search Summary

This research need was recommended and prioritized through multiple stakeholder engagements during the 20-123 project. No related literature was found that incorporated financial risk at the enterprise and program levels. In addition, the recent COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the consequences of income and financial instability in transportation agencies.

The importance of incorporating risk at the enterprise and program levels has been recognized, and AASHTO published a guide summarizing how DOTs can establish and benefit from an enterprise risk management (ERM) program (AASHTO Guide for Enterprise Risk Management, 2016). This guide divides risk into four levels: enterprise, program, project, and activity. Risks to the enterprise are identified as the risks that affect the organization and its strategic objectives; while risk to the program includes risks that are “common to group of projects that achieve strategic goals” or those that “could affect the performance of major programs such as safety, pavements, bridges, maintenance, information technology, local programs, project delivery, finance, and human resources”. The guide provides an overview on what enterprise risk management is, highlights the benefits, and also includes information of how to identify, assess and manage those risks. However, further guidance and methodologies on how to assess and manage financial risks at the enterprise and program levels are still needed.


Objectives

The purpose of the proposed research project is to provide state DOTs with the necessary tools to assess and manage financial risk at the enterprise and program levels.

The specific research tasks to accomplish the main objective include:

• Task 1 – Conduct an in-depth literature review of all studies related to assessment and management of financial risks in transportation agencies, especially at the enterprise and program levels, including national and international examples as available.
• Task 2 – Conduct a gap assessment of the state of practice to determine what is still needed to incorporate financial risk at the enterprise and program levels.
• Task 3 – Develop a methodology for identifying and quantifying financial risks at the enterprise and program levels.
• Task 4 – Develop metrics and performance indicators for evaluating effectiveness of financial risk countermeasures.
• Task 5 – Develop decision-making tools for resource allocation under conditions of financial uncertainty.
• Task 6 – Develop methodology and guidance on consideration of program and potentially project-level financial risk within the enterprise.
• Task 7 – Pilot test the developed processes with multiple state DOTs and revised methodology as needed.
• Task 8 – Develop an implementation guide to help state DOTs to incorporate these processes into existing agency programs and projects.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

The recent COVID-19 pandemic greatly reduced American consumption, thus dramatically reducing revenues. State DOTs have seen their budgets slashed by 30% or more, forcing delays in some projects and reductions in workforce. A well-funded mandate could mean state DOTs have additional funding for enhancing resilience, while an unfunded mandate could force a DOT to choose between maintenance and projects. Not having the necessary funding for certain programs or projects may have a short or long term negative impacts on agency mission (e.g., lack of funding to continue or improve safety programs).

This project aims to provide transportation leaders with the necessary decision-making tools for allocating resources when subjected to unpredicatable financial conditions in order to reduce risks and increase the return on investment (ROI).


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

In order to implement financial risk assessments at the enterprise level, senior executives and policy makers need to take the lead and champion these initiatives.
Similarly, program managers need to take the major role on encouraging the implementation of financial risk assessments into program level.
It is key that senior executives, policy makers and program managers need to have a communication plan to communicate with peers on their areas in order to assess the financial risks to multiple programs and/or projects that may affect each other. In addition, providing staff training on the subject of financial risk, especially at the enterprise and program levels, is a key factor on successful implementation. Training material (including guidance, workshops, peer exchanges, etc.) to help implementation champions should be developed and used to create awareness and facilitate assessments.


Notes

TAM/ERM - Incorporating Risk Management into Maintenance Practice

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$450,000

Research Period

18-24 months

Description

FHWA Directive 5520 encourages state DOTs to develop risk-based, cost effective strategies to minimize the impacts of climate change. Environmental stressors, such as extreme heat and extreme cold, and changes in the frequency and magnitude of extreme events, is changing the lifecycle of transportation assets; i.e, reducing service life, shortening replacement cycles, and increasing maintenance costs. Maintenance personnel offer valuable insight as to the costs associated with achieving performance goals. At the same time, maintenance personnel will require guidance as to how to incorporate risk models into maintenance, inspection, replacement, and repair cycles so that scheduled and routine maintenance continue to mitigate the risk from asset deterioration.


Background

FHWA Directive 5520 encourages state DOTs to develop risk-based, cost effective strategies to minimize the impacts of climate change. Environmental stressors, such as extreme heat and extreme cold, and changes in the frequency and magnitude of extreme events, is changing the lifecycle of transportation assets; i.e, reducing service life, shortening replacement cycles, and increasing maintenance costs. Maintenance personnel offer valuable insight as to the costs associated with achieving performance goals. At the same time, maintenance personnel will require guidance as to how to incorporate risk models into maintenance, inspection, replacement, and repair cycles so that scheduled and routine maintenance continue to mitigate the risk from asset deterioration.


Literature Search Summary

This research differs from the existing body of research found in a review of relevant literature due to its focus on the integration of risk management with existing processes. During the review, there was no body of work that mentions incorporating risk management into the existing maintenance practices. In addition, transportation practitioners during multiple stakeholder engagements during the development of the NCHRP 20-123 project initiated the conversation and advocated for the need of this potential research topic.


Objectives

The purpose of the proposed research project is to develop a framework and guidance to help state DOTs on how to integrate and manage risk into maintenance practice. The specific research tasks to accomplish the main objective include:
• Task 1 – Conduct an in-depth literature review of all studies related to risk assessment and its incorporation in maintenance practices not only in the transportation sectors but also in other sectors (e.g., water sector, etc.)
• Task 2 – Conduct a gap assessment of the state of practice to determine what is still needed to incorporate risk assessment in maintenance practices
• Task 3 – Develop methodologies to incorporate existing risk assessment methodologies into maintenance practices.
• Task 4 – Develop methodologies for determining how to adjust maintenance cycles and changes in maintenance costs under non-stationary conditions.
• Task 5 – Develop guidance to help state DOTs to implement risk assessments into maintenance practice.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

From the literature review, there does not seem to be any previous or ongoing research focusing on this topic. This indicates a gap in the area and urgency for research to fill it. From this research, a gap assessment in leadership, coordination, and workforce capabilities and a guidance or framework on how to integrate risk into maintenance practice will be developed.
This project will help state DOTs to make informed decisions to allocate funding to maintenance practices on assets that might have higher risks than others based on potential threats/hazards.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

In order to implement risk management into maintenance practice, state DOTs will be responsible for using the research results and engaging the necessary staff. State DOTs can implement the research within their own organization through the flexible framework and utilize the guidance document produced from the project. They would need to conduct a risk assessment for their ongoing maintenance practices and implement updated maintenance practices.

What existing venues or processes could be used to support implementation?
It is key that senior executives, policy makers and program managers need to have a communication plan to communicate with peers in order to effectively integrate risk management. Additional products and activities like training workshops to increase the integration of risk management into maintenances practices, as well as peer exchanges and informative presentations can help state DOTs positively impact their organization.


Notes

ERM – Integrating Accepted Best Practices Learned and Revisiting Our Organizational Mission Across Sectors to Create a More Safe, Equitable Society

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Started from War Games topics, planning to submit to the Domestic Scan Program
• Focused on how do we integrate accepted best practice learnings and revisit our organizational mission across sectors to create a more safe, equitable society?
• Currently researching organizational missions, emerging performance areas, and equity plans within organizations before next meeting

Areas we may want to include:
- Organizational components that have been successful (for example)
- Organizational factors
- Risk management approaches
- Innovative strategies
- Stakeholder partnership (more than engagement)
- Successful support systems
- Strategic frameworks - organizational missions
- Performance management systems
- Equity plans, etc.
- Types of leadership exhibited in high-performing agencies
- Process
- I.D. promising practices
- Assess likelihood of reproducing these results
- Investigate issues, assess tech transfer opportunities and methods
- Document results

Also consider barriers to addressing societal needs, how leading agencies have overcome these challenges (for example):
- Rapid pace of change
- Complex, sometimes conflicting social pressures
- Funding
- Politics
- Other?


Background

Started from War Games topics, planning to submit to the Domestic Scan Program
• Focused on how do we integrate accepted best practice learnings and revisit our organizational mission across sectors to create a more safe, equitable society?
• Currently researching organizational missions, emerging performance areas, and equity plans within organizations before next meeting

Areas we may want to include:
- Organizational components that have been successful (for example)
- Organizational factors
- Risk management approaches
- Innovative strategies
- Stakeholder partnership (more than engagement)
- Successful support systems
- Strategic frameworks - organizational missions
- Performance management systems
- Equity plans, etc.
- Types of leadership exhibited in high-performing agencies

Also consider barriers to addressing societal needs, how leading agencies have overcome these challenges (for example):
- Rapid pace of change
- Complex, sometimes conflicting social pressures
- Funding
- Politics
- Other?


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Process
- I.D. promising practices
- Assess likelihood of reproducing these results
- Investigate issues, assess tech transfer opportunities and methods
- Document results


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Keeping Inventory and Condition Data Up to Date

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$500,000

Research Period

18-24 months

Description

Emerging technologies, such as the use of drones for inspections, LiDAR field data collection, and continuous monitoring of real-time sensor data (among others), hold the promise of transforming asset data collection for transportation asset management. As this technology has been evolving and improving, federal regulation, specifically, MAP-21 and the FAST Act, has pushed many agencies to collect and utilize a detailed inventory of infrastructure assets and transportation data. With the collection of high-volume asset inventory and condition data, such as LiDAR point cloud data, the accessibility and affordability of data collection has become a clear issue for agencies, particularly as they aim to manage and visualize collected data for both strategic and operational transportation asset management planning purposes. Therefore, research and guidance on the benefits and applications of these emerging technologies as well as how frequently that inventory and condition data need to be collected or assessed is necessary.

The focus of this research would be on the following:
• Address the adoption and practical application of these emerging collection technologies and the rapid pace of technological advancement.
• Provide guidance on the level of detail and frequency interval necessary for data collection to support TAM at both the state and local levels.
• Determine how condition assessment can be applied to the performance measures of both pavement and non-pavement assets.
• Further investigate and recommend tools capable of visualizing asset extraction layers, as well as presenting data to stakeholders in powerful GIS formats with standardized TAM graphics for universal interpretation.
• The research should consider any refinements that would need to occur in network level asset management data collection to make the data useful for compliance (i.e. ADA), safety (i.e. bridge clearances) or engineering (design or construction) purposes.


Background

 Emerging technologies, such as the use of drones for inspections, LiDAR field data collection, and continuous monitoring of real-time sensor data (among others), hold the promise of transforming asset data collection for transportation asset management. As this technology has been evolving and improving, federal regulation, specifically, MAP-21 and the FAST Act, has pushed many agencies to collect and utilize a detailed inventory of infrastructure assets and transportation data. With the collection of high-volume asset inventory and condition data, such as LiDAR point cloud data, the accessibility and affordability of data collection has become a clear issue for agencies, particularly as they aim to manage and visualize collected data for both strategic and operational transportation asset management planning purposes. Therefore, research and guidance on the benefits and applications of these emerging technologies as well as how frequently that inventory and condition data need to be collected or assessed is necessary.
The focus of this research would be on the following:
• Address the adoption and practical application of these emerging collection technologies and the rapid pace of technological advancement.
• Provide guidance on the level of detail and frequency interval necessary for data collection to support TAM at both the state and local levels.
• Determine how condition assessment can be applied to the performance measures of both pavement and non-pavement assets.
• Further investigate and recommend tools capable of visualizing asset extraction layers, as well as presenting data to stakeholders in powerful GIS formats with standardized TAM graphics for universal interpretation.
• The research should consider any refinements that would need to occur in network level asset management data collection to make the data useful for compliance (i.e. ADA), safety (i.e. bridge clearances) or engineering (design or construction) purposes.


Literature Search Summary

• PROJECT: Best Practices on Collecting Asset Information from the Construction Stage, South Carolina Department of Transportation, 2021, Proposed 2021-10-01
• PROJECT: Automated Guardrail Inventory and Condition Evaluation, Massachusetts Department of Transportation, 2021, Active 2021-01-18
• Highway Asset and Pavement Condition Management using Mobile Photogrammetry, Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2021
• Automated Real-Time Roadway Asset Inventory using Artificial Intelligence, Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Volume 2674, Issue 11, 2020, pp 220-234, 2020-11
• Computer Vision for Rapid Updating of the Highway Asset Inventory, Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Volume 2674, Issue 9, 2020, pp 245-255, 2020-09
• GIS Tools and Apps—Integration with Asset Management, 2020, 155p, 2020-02
• PROJECT: A Method for Pavement Marking Inventory and Retroreflectivity Condition Assessment Using Mobile LiDAR, Massachusetts Department of Transportation, $200,000, 2019, Active, 2019-10-21
• SCDOT Asset Data Collection Assessment, 2019, 99, 2019-08
• PROJECT: GIS Tools and Applications: Integration with Asset Management, Minnesota Department of Transportation, $59,021.12, 2019, Completed, 2019-04-19
• Novel Cloud and Mobile Technology for Road Asset Management in Saint Lucia, 26th World Road Congress, 2019, 9, 2019
• Implementation of Road Asset Management System in Saint Lucia, 26th World Road Congress, 2019, 16, 2019
• Innovative Approaches to Asset Management, 2019, 110, 2019
• Machine Learning Powered Roadside Asset Extraction using LiDAR, TAC 2018: Innovation and Technology: Evolving Transportation - 2018 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada, 2018
• Life-Cycle Approach to Collecting, Managing, and Sharing Transportation Infrastructure Asset Data, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Volume 143, Issue 6, 2017-06
• Highway Asset Inventory Data Collection Using Airborne LiDAR, Transportation Research Board 96th Annual Meeting, 2017, 15
• Evaluation of High-Speed Mobile Technologies for Sign Inventory and Maintenance, Transportation Research Board 96th Annual Meeting, 2017, 13, 2017
• Implementation of Aerial LiDAR Technology to Update Highway Feature Inventory, 2016, 133, 2016-12
• Guide for Efficient Geospatial Data Acquisition using LiDAR Surveying Technology, 2016, 12, 2016
• LEVERAGING CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION AND DOCUMENTATION FOR ASSET INVENTORY AND LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT Transportation Research Board 95th Annual Meeting, 2016, 20, 2016
• Handbook For Including Ancillary Assets in Transportation Asset Management Programs, Federal Highway Administration, 2018


Objectives

Working backward from the key decisions that need to be made across stakeholder groups over an asset’s lifecycle, this project seeks to identify current practices and recommend ongoing improvements in relation to collecting, storing, sharing, and maintaining asset inventory and condition data (“data management”). With a focus on implementation, the project will build on existing research by identifying the pros and cons of different data management methods and technologies, so that decision makers across departments can collaborate more effectively when planning and investing in data management approaches. The practice of data management is evolving at a rapid pace, given the proliferation of new technologies that are being used increasingly alongside traditional approaches. In parallel, agencies are recognizing the multi-stakeholder nature of asset management, as departments such as compliance, safety, engineering, operations and environmental begin to see the benefits of access to reliable, accurate asset information. This project will answer key data management questions such as: What data should be collected to address all stakeholder needs? How, when, and how often? Using which technologies and platforms? At what cost? And why?
It will also provide guidance to agencies on the most appropriate approaches to collecting, storing, sharing and maintaining asset data, based on the needs of the various stakeholders involved in data-based decision-making.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

Inventory and condition data collection and data management are continuously changing in response to changing demands of state and local agencies. However, despite these changing demands, inventory data is constantly being used by multiple stakeholders to make decisions (planning, operations, safety, contractors). While the inventory data may not necessarily be accurate or timely due to these agency constraints or because the agency’s collection processes lack maturity (i.e. ancillary assets), this data is still being used to make decisions at all levels within an agency, yet there is little consensus on how to manage data related to those assets.
The benefits of this research are that it will provide a complete view of inventory and condition issues across asset classes; support agencies with lessons learned from others (from data collection to post-processing/extraction and related decision making) and enable collaboration on new approaches, particularly for secondary asset data management; support implementation of TAMPs by helping to ensure data is reliable and accurate; support preparation for emerging technologies such as CAVES, which will be dependent on secondary assets, such as striping, roadside units (RSUs) and signals.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

Methods to incorporate products into practice:
- Web-based training for agency staff
- Case studies from peer agencies
- Assessment of existing technologies including functionalities, pros/cons, and costs
Intended audience:
- Decision makers at all organizational levels and across departments/disciplines
- Contractor and consultant community


Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

A Guide for Creating Visualizations

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$415,000

Research Period

24 months

Description

There is a rich body of research in NCHRP 226, Vizguide, and NCHRP Project 20-24(93)B(02), Communicating Performance Management, and NCHRP Synthesis 52-16, Visualization of Highway Performance Measures, documented the range of practices state DOTs are currently using regarding their visualization of performance measures. The goal of this research would be to evaluate the noteworthy practices currently being pioneered by state DOTs using the foundation of these previous NCHRP projects and then develop an easy-to-use guide to creating effective visualizations.
NCHRP Synthesis 52-16, Visualization of Highway Performance Measures, found that there is little guidance or widely shared practices on how to evaluate a visualization’s effectiveness using a systematic process. This finding illuminated a need to implement a clear set of principles that can be used to evaluate visualizations that are used internally and externally. This evaluation guide would cover two distinct objectives – the effectiveness of the visualization is communicating information and the effectiveness of the visualization is changing behavior.
Even though the depth of information presented in many of the visualizations provided to the general public presents a sophisticated view of vast amounts of information, it does not yet provide a complete solution. Even with clear visualizations providing insight to solutions that could solve vexing problems (e.g., the effectiveness of wearing seat belts or not texting), there are still a significant number of people who don’t respond to the data and are killed in crashes they may have survived if they chose to buckle up or not text while they drive. Determining the means to evaluate the effectiveness of visualizations, not only to provide information, but to influence behavior would significantly enhance the value and the time and effort spent creating the visualizations.


Background

A visualization can be “effective” in several ways: providing information, informing policy and decision making, and influencing behavior. There is little guidance on how to systematically evaluate a visualization’s effectiveness by either of these measures. This problem affects both transportation professionals and the traveling public – including movers of freight.
Even with clear visualizations providing insight – sophisticated “nuggets of truth” from vast amounts of information and solutions to vexing problems, there may be viewers who do not comprehend or respond. Developing a means to evaluate the effectiveness of visualizations deployed internally and externally would significantly enhance their value.
This research addresses this problem by: evaluating the effectiveness of noteworthy practices currently being pioneered by state DOTs that were documented, but not assessed, in previous NCHRP projects; addressing the new tools that have proliferated, such as Tableau, R, Infogram; and ultimately developing an easy-to-use guide to creating effective visualizations.


Literature Search Summary

NCHRP Synthesis 52-16, Visualization of Highway Performance Measures, identified the problem stated above, that there is little guidance or widely shared practices on how to evaluate a visualization’s effectiveness using a systematic process. This research will build and expand upon that research, as well as NCHRP 226, Vizguide, NCHRP Project 20-24(93)B(02), Communicating Performance Management, and NCHRP Synthesis 20-05/Topic 52-16 Visualizing of Highway Performance Measures.


Objectives

The object of this research is to develop an easy-to-use guide for evaluating the effectiveness of transportation visualizations that state DOTs can use to improve communication and decision-making. With this guide, state DOTs will have the tools to hone their message, manage the data overload that occurs in visualizations and impact travel behavior with effective visual data increasing safety, security and mobility.
The suggested tasks for this research are:
1) Research the essential components of what makes a visualization effective. Build off NCHRP 226 and 20-24(93)B(02). Evaluate the visualization techniques and practices documented in NCHRP Synthesis 52-16.
2) Create a guidebook that clearly communicates how to approach a new visualization and guide its creation.
3) Evaluate how to gain feedback on the effectiveness of a visualization in communicating information and influencing behavior, and also facilitates decision making. This could build off practices currently used for public service announcements (PSA).
4) Identify or develop noteworthy practices for evaluating the effectiveness of a visualization.
5) Create a Guidebook that provides state DOTs with options for evaluating the effectiveness of a visualization.
6) Integrate the two elements – creation and evaluation – into a guide that demonstrates the feedback loop of continuous improvement enabled by joining these two functions.
7) Establish an online case study website that showcases exceptional and innovative visualizations. This could include a category for the use of emerging data and emerging analytic capacity so state DOTs could maintain currency in innovative practices. The website would be updated by the TRB AED80 Visualization in Transportation Committee yearly by acknowledging award winning entries.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

Effective data visualization has the power to dramatically improve the safety and efficiency of the transportation system. Previous research demonstrates that state DOTs have invested considerable time and expertise in developing visualizations for performance measures and need to communicate results effectively.
This guide would build on and evolve prior work by developing clear guidance on how to create effective visualizations and how to evaluate their effectiveness. It will enable states to focus and capitalize upon the investment, time and expertise they are currently deploying. It will provide a roadmap to the states who are in the early development of their visualization efforts and will provide an opportunity for well-established programs to expand their efforts by evaluating the effectiveness of their visualizations.
Addressing the creation and evaluation of effective visualizations together creates a feedback loop that enables and promotes continuous improvement.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

Transportation planners and practitioners responsible for analyzing and communicating data through visualization have a great need for this research. This guide has a built-in audience of the users of both previous research efforts and the Transportation Asset Management (TAM) portal. Additionally, the guide would lend itself to promotion through the committees of the TRB data section, particularly AED80; and the AASHTO Committee structure, particularly CDMA (Data), COP (Planning), CPBM (Performance), and TAM (Asset management).


Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Data visualization platforms and tools for statewide asset inventory data analysis and management

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Emerging technologies hold the promise of transforming asset data collection for transportation asset management such as the use of drones for inspections, LiDAR field data collection, continuous monitoring of real-time sensor data, and more. While the technology has been transforming, MAP-21 and the Fast Act jump started at many agencies in attaining an inventory of infrastructure assets and transportation data. At the same time, accessibility and affordability to collect high volumes of asset inventory data, such as LiDAR point cloud data, present the problem of how agencies can visualize and manage such large amounts of data and integrate the many layers for each transportation asset management plan. Now that the need for such data is federally recognized, further research is needed to understand what the latest technologies for asset analysis can offer an agency as well as how frequently that information needs generated.

Research is needed in the following areas:
• Address the adoption and practical application of these technologies and the rapid pace of technological advancement.
• What level of extraction detail and frequency interval is needed to support TAM at both the state and local levels and how can the condition assessment be applied to the performance measures of both pavement and non-pavement assets?
• Further investigate what tools are capable of visualizing asset extraction layers, as well as presenting such data to all stakeholders in powerful GIS formats with standardized TAM graphics for universal interpretation.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Development of Asset Class Strategies to Address the Lifecycle Capital and O&M Needs of Assets

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This is a typical function of an AMS, in which different asset classes, such as different types of roads (interstate, state, local, or possibly differentiated by traffic volumes), bridges, etc are allocated different treatments and possibly different budgets per asset class. This synthesis could be both a panel study (cross-section of states) and a time series study (how the policies developed over time), and could also involve systems which use life cycle costing and those which do not.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Successful Practices for Managing Uncertainty: Lessons Learned from the Pandemic

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Among the many difficulties raised by COVID-19, the pandemic does have the potential of affecting asset management practices in diverse ways. On the one hand, reduced traffic might reduce road maintenance costs; on the other hand, ordering more goods might increase truck traffic and thus increase deterioration. Even if deterioration were the same, the road agency would always have the option of utilizing a less expensive treatment alternative and thus reduce the capital needs and maintenance budget.


Background

Among the many difficulties raised by COVID-19, the pandemic does have the potential of affecting asset management practices in diverse ways. On the one hand, reduced traffic might reduce road maintenance costs; on the other hand, ordering more goods might increase truck traffic and thus increase deterioration. Even if deterioration were the same, the road agency would always have the option of utilizing a less expensive treatment alternative and thus reduce the capital needs and maintenance budget.


Literature Search Summary

● FHWA case study on fiscal management during pandemic (focus on accomplishing work opportunistically vs. narrow risk-management focus)
● 2020 State DOT COVID-19 Response Survey: Use of Transportation Data and Information for Decision Makers https://www.tam-portal.com/document/dot-covid19-data-survey/


Objectives

● Survey and interview State DOTs and others as to their practices during COVID. For example: observe their budget outlays, activities performed and data collection.
● Focus on uncertainty in general - such as funding uncertainty; the results could be utilized for good practices not just in times of widespread disease, but also for times of economic austerity such as a recession. Note: The visualization committee (AED80) has been kicking around a research idea related to how to VISUALIZE uncertainty. Could be a good opportunity to collaborate with that TRB committee. Anne-Marie McDonell and Matt Haubrich are both on AED80 so feel free to reach out.
● Potential to focus on risk management with respect to federal TPM target-setting (rather than risk management with respect to funding uncertainty).


Urgency and Potential Benefits

Question of understanding impacts vs. position for post-pandemic


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Linking DOT Project Prioritization Process with TAM Project Selections with ROI

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Several economic optimization methods are linked with TAM project selections. One of the economic indicators in measuring them is the ROI (which can be defined in various ways), but there are others such as NPV, IBC, FYRR and more. This research needs statement refers to the need of connecting prioritization / different approaches to asset management (such as optimization) and TAM project selections and economic indicators.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Calculation of Maintenance Backlog

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

There are several known methods of estimating the maintenance backlog – via budget (raising the network to a given level within a given number of years), length or percentage of the network under a given maintenance standard (such as PCI, PSI, IRI or other indicator),


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Cost Comparison of Doing Work Early on Assets

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This question is usually dealt with in road assets but can be expanded to bridges and other assets as well. It is part of a life cycle cost analysis when the evaluation is performed on different treatments which are differentiated by their frequency (usually every X years) and thus influencing their cost. Many Asset Management Systems incorporate this kind of analysis.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

EDI (Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion) and Other Indicators to Improve TAM Impact and Outcomes

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$400,000

Research Period

24 months

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

Investments in roadways have historically been focused on safety, mobility, and system preservation considerations. As our understanding of the impacts of roadway decisions mature, other factors such as socio-economic impact, sustainability, accountability, transparency, integrity, and innovation are increasing in importance by State Departments of Transportation (DOTs). Recently, strategic initiatives related to DEI are growing in importance and need to be considered in transportation investment planning. Advancing the understanding of DEI and other related indicators can help DOTs improve the impact of TAM investment decisions, especially to underserved communities.


Literature Search Summary

• American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). 2021. State DOT CEOs Talk Transportation Equity at EPW Hearing. Online article published May 12, 2021. AASHTO, Washington D.C.
• Archer, D. (2021). Transportation Policy and the Underdevelopment of Black Communities, New York University School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 21-12, New York, NY.
• Colorado Senate Bill 21-260, Sustainability of the Transportation System. Signed June 17, 2021. Https://leg.colorado.gov/bills/sb21-260.
• Connect Oakland, TRB Webinar: Addressing Justice in Transportation, June 28, 2021
• ICF Incorporated, LLC. (2020). Summary of Critical Issues for Transportation and Equity. Transportation Research Board. Washington, D.C.
• Larson, S. (2021) How Chicago Could Build Equity into Transportation. Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, Chicago, IL
• Litman, T. (2021). Evaluating Transportation Equity: Guidance for Incorporating Distributional Impacts in Transportation Panning. Victoria Transport Policy Institute, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
• Minnesota DOT (MnDOT). (2019). Advancing Transportation Equity: Strategies for Reducing Transportation Disparities, CTS Research Brief 2019-01, St. Paul, MN.
• National Public Radio (NPR). (2021). A Brief History of How Racism Shaped Interstate Highways, NPR Online News Article published April 7, 2021
• North Front Range Metropolitan Planning Organization (NFRMPO). 2021. Environmental Justice (EJ) Plan. North Front Range Metropolitan Planning Organization, Fort Collins, CO.
• Singer, J. (2018). Inside the Nation’s First Transportation Equity Program. Vision Zero Cities Journal, Transportation Alternatives, Published Online November 13, 2018.
• Twaddell, H. and B. Zgoda. (2020). Equity Analysis in Regional Transportation Planning Processes – Volume 1: Guide. Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Research Report 214. Transportation Research Board. Washington, D.C.
• Van Dort, L. A. Guthrie, Y. Fan, G. Baas. (2019). Advancing Transportation Equity: Research and Practice – Final Report. Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.
• Van Orden, D., and C. Grauberger. (2002). Environmental Justice Report. CDOT-DTD-R-2002-7. Colorado Department of Transportation, Research Branch. Denver, CO.


Objectives

The objective of this research is to produce guidance on how DOTs can improve the use of DEI and other related indicators in TAM investment decision making processes.

Tasks will include:
• Compile DEI and other related indicators for use in TAM decision-making
• Develop a framework for applying DEI and other related indicators in TAM decision-making processes, including:
o analysis activities to forecast impact
o scenario planning including identifying alternate investment options with an equity lens
o investment tradeoff decision-making
o community engagement activities including increasing the involvement of underserved communities.
• Develop additional quantitative and qualitative performance measures for asset management and planning that consider DEI and other factors in transportation investment decisions
• Produce a summary of challenges, inherent inequities, and obstacles in asset management and planning activities in order to help transportation add value to underserved communities
• Develop guidance for transportation agencies to use the DEI and other related indicators to balance competing strategic objectives related to asset performance, safety, mobility, and DEI.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

Most of the recent research related to environmental justice process have been focused on new transportation development. As state focus more of their budgets on maintaining their systems through TAM, better guidance is needed to ensure DEI and related considerations can be applied in a holistic view of investment decisions in transportation agencies.

The Biden administration and Secretary of Transportation Buttigieg stated that the administration’s priority encompasses efforts to “finally address major inequities – including those caused by highways that were built through Black and Brown communities, decades of disinvestment that left small towns and rural main streets stranded, and the disproportionate pollution burden from trucks, ports, and other facilities (AASHTO Daily Brief 03/29/21).” On May 25, 2021, the U.S. DOT published a Request for Information (ROI) on Transportation Equity Data in response to the Executive Order signed January 20, 2021, “Advancing Racial Equity and Support for Underserved Communities Through the Federal Government (Equity E.O.).” The information obtained through the ROI is intended to support the U.S. DOT’s determination of “whether, and to what extent, programs and policies perpetuate systemic barriers to opportunities and benefits for people of color and other underserved groups (Federal Register V. 86, No. 99, May 25, 2021).” The ROI specifically seeks input regarding the availability of potential data and assessment tools in the transportation sector that can support the U.S. DOT’s evaluation.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

• Transportation agency chief engineers, planning directors, asset managers, and transportation performance management leads will use the research products to improve their decision impact.
• The research will provide guidance on specific application and/or calculable modifications to existing tools and methods that transportation agencies can follow to make the changes needed for research implementation.
• The AASHTO Committee on Performance-Based Planning, the AASHTO TAM Portal, TRB Standing Committee on Transportation Asset Management (AJE30), TRB Standing Committee on Performance Management (AJE20) will support the research implementation.
• TRB presentations and webinars are will be required for research implementation.
• Workshops, peer exchanges, pilot testing, verification and validation of research results are possible implementation actions.


Notes

Best Practices of Linking Required Planning/Performance Documents/Processes

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$50,000

Research Period

6-12 months

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

A State DOT Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP) documents the investment strategies and expected outcomes from various asset classes, starting with the bridges and pavement of the National Highway System. The State DOT TAMP does not replace any existing state transportation plan (e.g., LRTP, freight plan, operations plan, etc.) but does provide critical inputs to existing plans, linking capital and maintenance expenditures related to asset preservation.
At the same time that state DOTs were developing their TAMPs, states also implemented a performance-based planning and programming approach, which applies performance management principles to transportation system policy and investment decisions. Performance-based long range transportation plans, statewide transportation improvement programs (STIPs), metropolitan planning organization (MPO) TIPs, and other performance-based plans like state freight plans must define key goals and objectives and establish measures to analyze short-, medium, and long-term implementation progress.
This Synthesis should review the advancement of State DOTs and MPOs to implement performance-based planning and programming with the help of implementation plans like the TAMP and documented processes for planning, investing, and evaluating performance outcomes.


Literature Search Summary

• NCHRP 08-113 Integrating Effective Transportation Performance, Risk, and Asset Management Practices
• NCHRP 02-27: Making Targets Matter….engagement for meaningful performance management
• A Guide for Incorporating Maintenance Costs into a Transportation Asset Management Plan
• Incorporating Resilience Considerations in Transportation Planning, TSMO and Asset Management
• Effective Methods for Setting Transportation Performance Targets
• Synthesis of Information Related to Highway Practices. Topic 51-05. Collaborative Practices for Performance-Based Asset Management Between State DOTs and MPOs
• FHWA review of 2019 State DOT Transportation Asset Management Plans (internal)


Objectives

The objective of this synthesis is to identify best practices from State DOTs of how to improve processes through required performance-based planning and programming document development and implementation through exploring:
• How State DOTs and MPOs are linking and including asset management decisions in their traditional planning processes;
• How agency’s integrate asset management project identification and prioritization into required planning processes;
• Gap analyses of where State DOTs and MPOs identify a need for more guidance on how to connect required performance-based documents to programming decisions;
• What management systems are in use to help agencies implement risk-based asset management with performance objectives and targets.
• Examples of where MPOs work in partnership with State DOTs to mobilize National Highway System partner owners (local agencies) to plan/program to performance targets.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

Benefits of this research include improved coordination between state DOTs, MPOs, and local transportation agencies through the development of performance-based planning and programming documents and implementation of PBPP project prioritization. Benefits may include improved sharing of data, efficient use of existing systems and identification of needed systems, and risk-based asset management of the system.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

CC - BIM for Infrastructure: A Focus on Asset Management

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$500,000

Research Period

18-24 months

Description

Research is needed on the importance of data governance from the conception of a project’s data dictionary, through the inventory and condition assessment and continuing with the data management and integration into transportation asset management systems. A question worth pursuing is whether all aspects of language, wording, numbering, and measurement units should be standardized or if template guides could be developed for each agency to standardize their unique asset type requirements, but in a nationally recognized format for easy translation.
After establishing governance routines for asset data collection and management, the next phase of research would involve the security aspects of an agency’s data as well as the quality assurance measures applicable to grow confidence in the data’s quality. A full review of best practices for data security procedures could break the barrier of IT to asset manager. Additionally, once definitions and governance procedures are established, the quality assurance process becomes more stream-lined and gives better confidence to the decision makers.
Asset managers know the data they need, and the data collection methods have been identified. What is needed is guidance on how to use the available data collection methods to meet the needs of asset managers.
BIM standards need to account for the fact that we have less data on existing assets than newer assets. However, it is existing infrastructure that has the most needs.


Background

Research is needed on the importance of data governance from the conception of a project’s data dictionary, through the inventory and condition assessment and continuing with the data management and integration into transportation asset management systems. A question worth pursuing is whether all aspects of language, wording, numbering, and measurement units should be standardized or if template guides could be developed for each agency to standardize their unique asset type requirements, but in a nationally recognized format for easy translation.

After establishing governance routines for asset data collection and management, the next phase of research would involve the security aspects of an agency’s data as well as the quality assurance measures applicable to grow confidence in the data’s quality. A full review of best practices for data security procedures could break the barrier of IT to asset manager. Additionally, once definitions and governance procedures are established, the quality assurance process becomes more stream-lined and gives better confidence to the decision makers.


Literature Search Summary

● FHWA - Identifying Data Frameworks & Governance for Establishing Future BIM Standards
● AED80 has a subcommittee on BIM, who has a sub-sub committee on BIM & AM
● PIARC TC 3.3 has a group working on TAM/BIM integration.
● NCHRP Report 831: Civil Integrated Management (CIM) for DOTs.


Objectives

● Guidance on establishing BIM data governance and quality standards to support asset management.
● Recommend standards for data transfer between data collection and asset management systems.
● Develop maturity scales for BIM implementation and establish appropriate maturity level for integration of TAM
● Research on BIM applications to support DOTs' data governance specific to the collection of data by one part of the agency can be used directly by other parts of the agency
● Evaluate cost effectiveness of collecting and managing data through BIM at a sufficient level of quality.
● Aligning the focused but detailed project-level data with network-wide but less detailed TAM data.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

Impact of Incomplete/Missing Annual Pavement Condition Data and Proposed Mitigation Strategies

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$250,000

Research Period

18 months

Description

Due to external stakeholder requirements and expectations (e.g., MAP 21 and FAST Acts) as well as internal DOT uses, DOTs typically collect pavement condition data (i.e., roughness, cracking and rutting or faulting depending on the pavement surfaces) on an annual cycle. However, disruptions of typical agency activities related to COVID-19 have resulted in data collection challenges, focusing attention on potential impacts of missing a data collection cycle. DOT may also face unforeseen workforce, contracting, data collection or processing challenges or other issues which could result in missed pavement data collection. In these cases, DOTs would benefit from understanding the range of potential impacts as well as potential mitigation strategies available to address these issues. Furthermore, in times of reduced budget, DOTs may desire to reduce the frequency of data collection, however should be informed of the potential impacts of that decision.


Background

Due to external stakeholder requirements and expectations (e.g., MAP 21 and FAST Acts) as well as internal DOT uses, DOTs typically collect pavement condition data (i.e., roughness, cracking and rutting or faulting depending on the pavement surfaces) on an annual cycle. However, disruptions of typical agency activities related to COVID-19 have resulted in data collection challenges, focusing attention on potential impacts of missing a data collection cycle. DOT may also face unforeseen workforce, contracting, data collection or processing challenges or other issues which could result in missed pavement data collection. In these cases, DOTs would benefit from understanding the range of potential impacts as well as potential mitigation strategies available to address these issues. Furthermore, in times of reduced budget, DOTs may desire to reduce the frequency of data collection, however they should be informed of the potential impacts of that decision.


Literature Search Summary

In the recent past, the FHWA sponsored a project which resulted in publications analyzing the impact of pavement monitoring frequency on pavement performance prediction and management system decisions (Haider et al. 2010, 2011). This study analyzed pavement sections from the Long Term Pavement Performance database and recommended monitoring cracking at a 1-year interval and roughness every 1 to 2 years. The proposed study will further investigate this issue and expand the analysis on the implications of missing a data collection cycle in their transportation management plans. Given that the FHWA reporting requirements are fairly recent, there is not much in the transportation literature about the impact of missing a data collection cycle. Furthermore, little information is available on potential strategies available to mitigate the impact of incomplete condition data.


Objectives

1. Evaluate the impacts of incomplete/missing annual pavement data collection to various aspects of agency asset and performance management, including technical considerations, such as network-level condition summary and performance forecast, maintenance, rehabilitation, and reconstruction decision-making, and condition deterioration and treatment improvement modeling.
2. Consider the effect of incomplete/missing data on the organization and processes, such as federal performance reporting and transportation asset management planning requirements, as well as impacts to other internal and external stakeholders and decision-making processes.
3. Analyze and derive recommendations on mitigation strategies that DOT could implement to minimize the impact of incomplete condition data.

Proposed research activities include:
1. Conduct a literature review to document:
○ DOT motivations and/or requirements for annual data collection.
○ Potential technical and organizational impacts or issues associated with missing an annual data collection.
○ Techniques available to mitigate the impacts of missing the collection.
○ DOTs known to currently (or in the recent past) complete pavement data collection on a 2 or more year data collection cycle.
2. Building from the literature review, survey State DOTs to capture:
○ DOT motivations and/or requirements for annual data collection
○ Potential technical and organizational impacts or issues associated with missing an annual data collection
○ Techniques available to mitigate the impacts of missing the collection.
○ DOTs that currently (or recently) collected pavement data on a 2 or more year data collection cycle
○ DOTs which have previously missed their established collection cycle
3. Conduct follow up interviews/surveys with DOTs that have longer collection cycles or which had previously missed an annual pavement data collection to understand perceived vs. actual impacts (both technical and organizational) and any mitigation strategies they employ.
4. Summarize literature review, survey results and follow up interviews to guide ongoing research activities
5. From a representative set of DOTs, collect available pavement condition and work history data, pavement deterioration and improvement benefit models
6. Utilize collected data to complete a statistical evaluation of the impact missing a year of data collection with respect to forecasted vs. actual performance results, and ability to identify priority investment areas based on previous year’s data collection, as well as other issues identified through the survey
7. Identify potential strategies to mitigate the impacts of incomplete condition data
8. Document survey results and evaluation outcomes
9. Produce a technical report summarizing impacts of, and potential mitigations for, missing an annual pavement collection cycle
Desired products include:
● Detailed listing of current requirements and/or motivations for annual pavement data collection
● Summary of perceived and actual impacts of missing an annual data collection against the listed motivations, supported with a statistical evaluation of actual DOT datasets where applicable
● A summary of potential mitigation strategies that can be employed to reduce the identified impacts


Urgency and Potential Benefits

State DOTs perform data collection with a certain frequency based on the data condition type. Due to the unpredicted situation we are facing in 2020 many DOTs have missed their data collection schedule and this would directly affect the uncertainties and potential emerging risks in asset management. State DOTs need effective ways to address this incompletion in data to improve their ability in decision-making and ultimately continue their asset management plans. Studies have shown that monitoring intervals and data collection frequency have an effect on performance predictions. A part of the uncertainty in performance prediction is due to the frequency of distress data collection.
Data curing methods could significantly help state DOTs use their previous data to forecast the missing ones. Private industries can help state DOTs perform data curing and data mining strategies. COVID-19 has caused a pause in asset management procedures, however the gap in data collection can be filled with the improvement in machine-learning products. It is therefore increasingly important for state DOTs to benefit from the technology-based services private industries offer and decrease the risk of incomplete data.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

The target audience for the research results is state DOT asset management and data quality management champions, whether self-designated or officially appointed. These individuals are likely already on board with the need for data curing and are aware of its benefits, but have been unable to convince executives or other senior decision-makers to sustainably implement data curing. There is a need for AASHTO and TRB committees to embrace the need for data curing. There is a possibility that TRB’s Pavement Management System committee will be interested in this subject, it is worth contacting them and explaining the objectives.


Notes

Developing a Robust Education, Training and Workforce Development Program for TPM and TAM

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$250,000

Research Period

15 months

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

TAM and TPM provide the foundation for performance-based investment decisions in transportation agencies at the federal, state, and local levels. Despite the fact that many transportation agencies have embraced the implementation of robust TAM and TPM programs to support their stewardship responsibilities, these topics are not typically incorporated into traditional education programs. In many cases, practitioners working in these areas acquire the skills needed while working on the job or take advantage of training materials available through various sources with limited support. Challenges with attaining skills, building competencies in an organization are compounded by knowledge succession needs with an aging workforce, tighter budgets, and uncertain in-person opportunities during an on-going pandemic, as well as evolving career expectations from skilled candidates in a globally competitive digital economy. A more accessible, efficient and attractive landscape of offerings, programs and career paths are needed to tackle the spectrum of training needs and challenges for effective TAM and TPM.
This study will explore cross-functional, multidisciplinary competencies, training needs in the TAM and TPM areas so that funding can be sought to streamline usage of existing opportunities, better integrate TAM and TPM principles within available programs, identify new skills needs driven by emerging risks or advancing technology, develop new training programs and partnerships needed. This also includes gaining an understanding of flexible, inclusive career paths to support innovation and productivity while improving return on training investment in a time of economic recovery. The study will inform AASHTO and TRB committees of existing gaps in training and recommend a strategy for addressing the gaps through a separate research study.
It is anticipated that this scoping study would be part of a three-phase research project:
• Phase I: Scoping Study for Developing an Education, Training and Workforce Development Program for TPM and TAM (this project)
• Phase II: Prototype and Testing of TPM/TAM Education, Training and Workforce Tools and Resources
• Phase III: Formal Development and Ongoing Support of TPM/TAM Education, Training and Workforce Tools and Resources

Task Description

Task 1: Define TPM and TAM Training and Education Needs
• Conduct a contextual and comprehensive analysis of the training needs for practitioners in TPM and TAM.
• Assess the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed by practitioners to perform their jobs well.
• Consider delivery methods in addressing needs.

Task 2: Conduct a Gap Analysis
• Summarize available training programs/materials in the US and abroad (notably Canada, Europe, Australia and New Zealand) and through other resources.
• Identify gaps between desired outcomes and current outcomes from available training and education.

Task 3: Develop Recommendations
• Summarize the findings from task 1 and 2.
• Recommend strategies for addressing the gaps.
• Present findings and recommendation in a final report.
• Prepare a Research Problem Statement(s) to develop the recommendations.
• Meet with the project panel to discuss recommendations.
• Incorporate changes into a final version of the report.


Literature Search Summary

AASHTO TC3 Program


Objectives

Better define the needs for education, training and workforce development related to transportation asset management and transportation performance management. Develop resources as needed for the following sub-areas:
Education—Writing curriculum for undergraduate and graduate courses
Training—For DOT and MPO staff in-depth career training, NHI, etc.
Workforce Development—e.g., TC3


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

Implementation of NCHRP 08-118: Risk Assessment Techniques for Transportation Asset Management

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Implementation of NCHRP 08-118: Risk Assessment Techniques for Transportation Asset Management


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation of NCHRP 08-129: Incorporating Resilience Concepts and Strategies in Transportation Planning

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Implementation of NCHRP 08-129: Incorporating Resilience Concepts and Strategies in Transportation Planning


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation of NCHRP 23-06: A Guide to Computation and Use of System Level Valuation of Transportation Assets

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$500,000

Research Period

12-18 Months

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

Determining the value of a transportation organization’s physical assets is important for both financial reporting and transportation asset management (TAM). In financial reporting, determining asset value is a fundamental step in preparing a balance sheet for financial statements to inform regulators and investors. For TAM, presenting data on the value of physical assets, such as pavement, bridges, and facilities, communicates what an organization owns and what it must maintain. Furthermore, information about asset value and how it is changing can help establish how the organization is maintaining its asset inventory and helps support investment decisions.

Calculating asset value for TAM is not simply good practice; it is also required of state Departments of Transportation (DOT) by Federal regulations. Title 23 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 515 details requirements for State DOTs to develop a risk-based Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP). The TAMP must include a calculation of the value of National Highway System (NHS) pavement and bridges, as well as the cost to maintain asset value.

Recently NCHRP Project 23-06 was performed to develop guidance for calculating asset value to support TAM applications. This research resulted in the development of the Asset Valuation Guide. This document is intended as a companion publication to the Transportation Asset Management Guide published by AASHTO. The Guide is accompanied by a web tool with an online version of the guidance. The guidance was developed to provide immediate support to highway and transit agencies developing their 2022 TAMPs, and to provide continuing support for other TAM-related applications.


Literature Search Summary

The NCHRP 23-06 research project that produced the asset valuation guide included an extensive review of the available literature related to asset valuation. Key references include:
• Accounting guidance and standards, including General Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement 34, standards of the International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation (IFRS) and the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guide Measuring Capital.
• Asset management guidance, including the AASHTO TAM Guide, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) TAM guidance, and Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia (IPWEA) Infrastructure Management Manual and Australian Infrastructure Financial Management Manual.
• Additional documents describing approaches used or proposed for asset valuation, such as State DOT TAMPs and other references.

Other research projects (recently completed, active, or pending) in this area include:
• NCHRP Project 08-109: Updating the AASHTO Transportation Asset Management Guide—A Focus on Implementation, Phase 1
• NCHRP Project 08-137: Digital Enhancements and Content for the AASHTO Transportation Asset Management Guide
• NCHRP Project 19-12: Guide for Financial Planning and Management in Support of Transportation Asset Management
• NCHRP Project 02-26: Implementation of Life-Cycle Planning Analysis in a Transportation Asset Management Framework.

This proposed study will build on these recent efforts and serve to provide updated asset valuation guidance.


Objectives

The objective of this implementation project support further testing and use of Asset Valuation Guide developed through NCHRP Project 23-06. This project will aid a set of transportation agencies in implementing the asset valuation guidance. A set of case studies will be developed based on the agency implementation efforts. Details on the case studies will be added to the web-based version of the asset valuation guidance and subsequent versions of the Asset Valuation Guide. Further, the web and printed versions of the Guide will be revised to reflect the additional experience gained from the case studies.

To support accomplishing the research objectives the effort will incorporate the following activities at a minimum:
• Delivery of a set of workshops to review and summarize the Asset Valuation Guide.
• Identification of a set of six transportation agencies to participate in implementation of the asset valuation guidance.
• Application of the asset valuation guidance for the selected set of agencies, resulting in calculation of asset value by asset class, the cost to maintain asset value and related measures such as the Asset Consumption Ratio, Asset Sustainability Ratio and Asset Funding Ratio.
• Illustration of how information on asset value can support improved TAM decisions.
• Refinement of the Asset Valuation Guide (printed and web versions) based on the results of the case studies.
• Development of supplemental tools and worksheets to assist in calculating asset value to support TAM utilize the Asset Valuation Guide.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

The proposed research is needed to help transportation agencies meet Federal requirements for developing their TAMPs. It will help build on recently completed NCHRP research and maximize the value of the research to the transportation community. Benefits of the research will include:
• Dissemination of the research completed previously through NCHRP Project 23-06.
• Assistance with a selected set of transportation agencies in valuing their assets to support TAM using the previously developed asset valuation guidance.
• Refinement of the Asset Valuation Guide to reflect experience gained from implementation
• Strengthening transportation agency TAM practice to include improved calculations of asset value and additional measures related to asset value that will help support TAM decisions.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

The target audience for this research includes executives, managers, and practitioners at state DOTs and at other agencies working to implement TAM and/or prepare financial plans and reports. It will be of value for asset managers, planners, and financial analysts. The guidance will be useful for helping establish asset value and related measures for asset classes including pavement, bridges, other structures, buildings, vehicles (including service vehicles, transit vehicles and ferries), rail track, traffic and safety assets, and other assets.

The results of this research will be highly applicable to the efforts of DOTs and national organizations such as AASHTO and FHWA in furthering the maturity of TAM and improving their approaches for TAMP development and financial reporting. It will help provide practical advice and overall guidance to agencies on how to value their assets regardless of their individual asset contexts, conditions, or budgetary situation.


Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

ERM - Risk and Resilience Program to Support Development of a Highway Risk & Resilience Manual

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$7,000,000

Research Period

5-7 Years

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

The US experienced 308 weather and climate related disasters since 1980 exceeding $2.085 trillion in physical losses and the loss of 14,492 lives. Between 1980-2020 the average number of billion- dollar events per year was 7.1, that number ballooned to 16.2 billion-dollar events per year on average between 2016-2020 (adjusted for Consumer Price Index). The most billion- dollar weather and climate related disasters occurred in 2020, with 22 billion-dollar events totaling $246.7 billion in losses and 553 deaths. As of September 2021, the current year is looking to break the record set in 2020 having experienced 18 billion-dollar events to date (Billion-Dollar Weather and Climate Disasters: Overview | National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) (noaa.gov) ). In addition, the recently published TRB Consensus Study on Resilience Metrics notes that 6 of the world’s 10 most costly natural disasters in 2020 occurred in the United States (TRB Resilience Metrics Consensus Study, 2021). With this level of impact on the nation’s infrastructure, transportation agencies need consistent methods to support decision making to address stressors such as extreme weather and climate change in planning, design, maintenance, and operations.
The TRB Resilience Metrics Consensus Study 2021 calls for the establishment of standard methods of analysis to support benefit-cost assessment to allow agencies to understand the “buy-down” of risk from capital and maintenance investments. In addition, the study calls on Congress to consider requiring that all federal funding candidate projects that involve long-lived assets requirement undergo well defined resilience assessments that account for changing risks of natural hazards and environmental conditions stemming from climate change. The proposed project will allow AASHTO and TRB to develop industry adopted standard methods of quantitative analysis in lieu of federally developed methods.

Proposed Program of Projects

A concerted level of commitment from AASHTO and TRB is needed to develop a single manual to serve as the “go-to” for quantitative analysis of financial risk to agency assets and the traveling public from extreme weather and climate change. Like the Highway Capacity Manual and the Highway Safety Manual, a single resource is needed to ensure consistent methods of analysis between projects and agencies, and to ensure adoption of robust quantitative methods to support benefit-cost analysis and decision making. A single manual will allow state, MPO, federal agencies to compare project investments on a level playing field – same models, same assumptions, same thresholds of performance. A single manual will also support the instruction of how to address extreme weather and climate change in planning and engineering curriculum at Universities ensuring future Transportation Professionals are equipped with the skills needed to support the adoption of such methods into practice. Finally, a single manual will allow the incorporation of extreme weather and climate change considerations in Professional Engineering examinations to further institutionalize these concepts in future design and decision making.
This program will establish a series of individual research projects to support the development of a Highway Resilience Manual born out of NCHRP 23-09, Scoping Study to Develop the Basis for a Highway Standard to Conduct an All-Hazards Risk and Resilience Analysis and NCHRP 20-123(04) Development of a Risk Management Strategic Plan and Research Roadmap. Similar to other NCHRP research programs such as NCHRP 20-102, Impacts of Connected Vehicles and Automated Vehicles on State and Local Transportation Agencies, this is a long-term research program that will result in an industry “standard” for all-hazards risk and resilience analysis for use in design, maintenance, and planning decision-making. In addition, the program of projects will address required data sources and work to field test the Highway Risk and Resilience Manual with a range of agencies as described in the following three phased approach and in the draft Research Roadmap:

  1. Phase I: Development of Highway Risk and Resilience Manual. An anticipated 3-year phase consisting of multiple projects and costing approximately $3,500,000. Year 1 estimated to cost $1,500,000 with years 2 and 3 estimated at $1,000,000 each. There would be multiple projects under this phase including five projects identified through NCHRP 23-09:
    • Establish quantitative assessment methodology for top priority threats and assets (e.g., culverts and flooding)
    • Develop historical data capture process quantitative analysis methods
    • Develop quantitative resilience assessment methodology
    • Establish performance metrics and thresholds for resilience and risk tolerance; provide guidance on reducing risk and improving resilience
  2. Phase II: Implementation of Highway Risk and Resilience Manual. A 2-year, $2,000,000 program that would implement/apply the Highway Risk and Resilience Manual to 8-10 transportation agencies. A few potential projects in Phase II are outlined here:
    • Create internal and external agency communication and collaboration practices to incorporate Highway Risk and Resilience Manual in decision making
    • Develop capacity building plan to identify institutional and educational needs to incorporate Highway Risk and Resilience Manual into practice
    • Pilot test Highway Risk and Resilience Manual
    • Identify institutional organizational and procedural (IOP) changes and implementation strategies for the successful adoption of Highway Risk and Resilience Manual
  3. Phase III: Development of Tools and Resources to Support the Highway Risk and Resilience Manual. A 2-year $1,500,000 effort to create automated, geospatial models that transportation agencies could use to implement the Highway Risk and Resilience Manual across networks or the transportation system.
    • Develop stand alone, open source computer script that can work within a GIS environment to automate Highway Risk and Resilience Manual calculations across multiple assets and threats in a geo-spatial setting
    • Develop spreadsheet-based tools to automate Highway Risk and Resilience Manual calculations across multiple assets and threats in a spreadsheet application
    • Selecting Performance Metrics for Evaluating Effectiveness of Risk Mitigation o Incorporating Risk Management into Maintenance Practice
    • Developing New Performance Metrics for Risk Management
    • Assessing the Impact of Common Risks on Federal Reporting Metrics

Literature Search Summary

Several studies on the topic of risk and resilience have been conducted through the NCHRP Process as well as FHWA and a few state DOTs. Below is a short list of some of the more relevant NCHRP projects that speak to quantitative methods of analysis for threats to asset condition and performance as well as those that worked to provide guidance on how to incorporate such analyses into decision making processes:
NCHRP 23-09 [Active] Scoping Study to Develop the Basis for a Highway Standard to Conduct an All-Hazards Risk and Resilience Analysis
NCHRP 20-123(04) Development of a Risk Management Strategic Plan and Research Roadmap
• NCHRP 08-113 Integrating Effective Transportation Performance, Risk, and Asset Management Practice
• NCHRP 23-08 A Guide for Incorporating Maintenance Costs into a Transportation Asset Management Plan
• NCHRP 08-36 Task 146 Incorporating Resilience Considerations in Transportation Planning, TSMO and Asset Management
• NCHRP 20-127 – Business Case and Communication Strategies for State DOT Resilience Efforts
• FHWA – Integrating Resilience into the Planning Process
• Colorado DOT - Risk and Resilience Analysis Procedure A Manual for Calculating Risk to CDOT Assets from Flooding, Rockfall, and Fire Debris Flow
The proposed program of projects would work to integrate this research and extend quantitative methods of analysis into a single manual or standard analysis procedure to ease the burden of the profession when seeking information from disparate sources.


Objectives

Transportation owners and operators are responsible for the transportation system and the delivery of a range of services and functions through the management of that system. There are inherent risks involved with the management of these systems, notwithstanding aging infrastructure, and fiscally constrained resources. Many agencies are moving toward performance-based resource allocation while simultaneously recognizing risks that may undermine their strategic goals. As these risks affect every component of a highway system to a greater or lesser extent, accurately accounting for and addressing these risks within a highway agency’s enterprise-wide management program is the goal which currently lacks analysis tools.
Investing in risk and resilience strategies and enhanced recovery to reduce or eliminate the impact of external events is also paramount to ensure a thriving, viable transportation system. Risk management requires the identification and assessment of potential threats and hazards, asset vulnerabilities from applicable threats, an evaluation of potential mitigation actions to reduce risk, a clear and easy to implement process to prioritize mitigation activities, and investment that aligns with agency strategic and performance goals. Asset management and more recently performance management, has been an ongoing focus of many research efforts. However, guidance for analytical risk assessment methods to support risk-based asset management processes is lagging. Risk assessment processes, methods, and tools are needed to integrate risk management into asset and performance management systems. In addition, an understanding of the relationship between risks and system resilience is lacking.
Basics needed:
• Adopted definitions
• Standard framework for quantitative risk based on expected financial losses to agency and traveling public
• Establishment of performance metrics for risk and resilience
• Suggested risk tolerance and resilience performance targets that agencies can customize
• Methods to incorporate climate projections into decision making
• Methods to analyze both deterministic and probabilistic input data (500-yr flood versus climate scenarios)
Future research can expand threats analyzed; assets analyzed; climate projections; life cycle cost; remaining life consideration of assets; environmental impacts, etc.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

Agencies are working to incorporate risk and resilience assessments from climate and extreme weather into their decision-making processes including design and maintenance within their overall asset management programs. However, the industry lacks a consistent, adopted method to support quantitative trade off analysis including benefit-cost assessments. As the recent TRB Resilience Metrics Consensus Study noted – the industry also lacks metrics to understand what acceptable risk is or how to measure resilience of highway systems. Without these methods or metrics, limited research dollars may be expended developing multiple methods without industry consensus as to what the target performance of system resilience should be.
The benefits of an industry adopted quantitative method of assessment of risk to highway assets and overall system resilience is the ability to understand and justify investments to maintain overall system operations and performance to withstand or rebound from climate related events when they occur. This type of proactive approach demonstrates the industry’s commitment to reducing losses to public infrastructure and the traveling public from climate related threats.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

Integrating Risk and Resilience into the Performance Management Decision-Making Process

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This program will establish a series of individual research projects born out of NCHRP 23-09, Scoping Study to Develop the Basis for a Highway Standard to Conduct an All-Hazards Risk and Resilience Analysis. Similar to other NCHRP research programs such as NCHRP 20-102, Impacts of Connected Vehicles and Automated Vehicles on State and Local Transportation Agencies, this is a long-term research program that will result in an industry standard for all-hazards risk and resilience analysis for use in decision-making. The product of this research program will be a collection of tools and techniques that transportation agencies can for all-hazards risk and resilience analysis similar to what has been produced for the Highway Capacity Manual and the Highway Safety Manual.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Integrating Risk and Resilience into the Performance Management Decision-Making Process


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

TPM – Analysis and Assessment of the National Performance Management Data

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$550,000

Research Period

18 months

Description

Evaluate current federal PM3 measures


Background

MAP-21 and the FAST Act laid the groundwork for a comprehensive national-level performance management framework. The first four-year reporting period began on January 1, 2018 and ends on December 31, 2021 and will result in the first complete set of consistent national-level performance management data. This will result in a unique opportunity to conduct the first analysis and assessment of this unique data set as well as combined with other data sets to tell a more complete and consistent state DOT performance management story.
An initial assessment of these data sets has been conducted. In 2020, FHWA sent out letters to each state DOT indicating whether they had made significant progress towards their target achievement for the five safety performance measures. And, in 2021, FHWA sent out subsequent letters about making significant progress with respect to the asset measures and system performance measures. AASHTO obtained copies of these data and conducted its own preliminary analysis of the data to better understand:
1. How far off were the targets from the actual numbers?
2. What is the impact of those states that did not make significant progress?
3. How many states' targets showed improvement?
4. What kind of targets did states establish?
5. What is the correlation between target setting technique and making significant progress?
6. Are there other techniques that could be used to determine making significant progress?
The results of this preliminary analysis was insightful and revealed a lot of good information. For example, a number of visuals were developed to show the how impactful missing a target by less than 0.05% can have on a state DOT not making significant progress. It also demonstrated the complexity associated with understanding what it meant for a state DOT to meet or exceed a target. However, this preliminary analysis, conducted by AASHTO staff and consultant support through the TPM Pooled Fund project, was very limited due to the resources available.
In fall 2021, the Committee on Performance-Based Management leadership group agreed that a more robust and extensive analysis is warranted that includes not only an analysis and assessment of the data, but recommendations on future capacity building activities to support state DOTs in the future as well as an assessment of future performance measures that may be better at telling the national TPM story.

Approach

This research will conducted in four parts.
Part 1 will focus on the detailed analysis of each of the 17 performance measures for the three federal performance measurement areas (safety, asset condition, and system performance). The analysis will primarily include the four years of performance measurement data reported by state DOTs as part of the federal performance management requirements for the first reporting period which goes January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2021. This data is consistent among all of the states and for all of the performance measures resulting in important consistency among the performance measures.
For each of the performance measurement areas, the following will be conducted:
• Data Analysis—Analysis of the performance measures data to better understand how states are performing. All of the data should be made available through the
• Target Setting Approach—Analysis of what type and how state DOTs established targets.
• Target Achievement—Assessment of the extent to which state DOTs achieved their targets.
All of this data and analysis, where applicable, should be made available through the AASHTO TPM Portal Benchmarking website at https://benchmarking.tpm-portal.com/.
Part 2 will focus on developing a comprehensive performance management story which provides an authoritative assessment and narrative of how state DOTs are performing. The performance management story should be based upon the following three categories:
• Funding Sources—A detailed analysis and assessment of the funding sources that state DOTs use to fund transportation projects in their states. This should include an assessment at the individual state as well as at the national level.
• Project Selection Process—A summary of the approaches, frameworks, and techniques state DOTs use to identify projects to fund using their funding sources.
• Condition, Outputs, and Outcomes—Using the results of the Data Analysis from Part 1, provide a summary of the condition of critical assets, the type of outputs state DOTs are seeing through their project selection process, and the long-term outcomes of the project selection process.
The State DOT TPM Story should be made available through the AASHTO TPM Portal website at www.tpm-portal.com. The State DOT TPM Story should include a print version and interactive web-based version that can be reasonably updated as new data is made available.
Part 3 will focus on future capacity building activities and performance measures that could be used to better tell the national TPM story. First, based upon the results and insights gained from Part 1 and 2, needed capacity building activities will be identified and delivered as resources allow. These activities could include training programs offered through the AASHTO TC3 program, new/updated NHI training, or peer exchanges. The focus should be on how best to build the capacity of transportation agencies to deliver a performance-based management program gained from the insights and experiences of the first performance management reporting period.
Second, the final report will provide some conclusions on future performance measures, approaches, and technologies that could be used by transportation agencies to implement and deliver a performance-based management program. These recommendations should be based upon the insights and experience from the first performance management reporting period. It should reflect the idea that the performance management field is constantly changing and evolving, just as society and technology does, and that what and how we measure performance is dynamic.


Literature Search Summary

NCHRP 20-24(20), (37), (97), (127)
NCHRP 20-24(37): This project, Measuring Performance among State DOTs: Sharing Good Practices, put in place a foundation on which the first set of national performance measures were created. A similar program needs to established on which to further develop relevant national-level performance measures.
Data Sources
• National Bridge Inventory (NBI): https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/bridge/nbi.cfm
• 17 National Performance Measure Reporting System: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/tpm/reporting/state/
• National Performance Management Research Data Set (NPMRDS): https://npmrds.ritis.org/analytics/
• Highway Statistic Series: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinformation/statistics.cfm
• FHWA Performance Management Data including: Results from the current reporting period (January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2021), AASHTO Analysis of the National PM Safety Data (May 2020), Target Data Analysis of the Federal Performance Measures (July 2021)


Objectives

The objective of this research is to prepare an authoritative analysis and assessment of the national performance management data and, based upon the analysis and assessment, to provide recommendations on future capacity building activities and possible new performance measures. There are three sub-objectives focused on:

  1. Analysis of the national performance management data for the three performance measurement areas (safety, assets, and system performance) will be conducted to better understand trends, target setting approaches, and target achievement by state DOTs; and
  2. Assessment of the performance management data that provides a comprehensive and compelling story on the results of the performance management provisions.
  3. Identification of future capacity building needs and performance measures.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

The results of this research are important and significant. This will be the first time that researchers will be able to use a complete set of the national-level performance management data to conduct a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the performance management program. This will research will serve as an authoritative and independent assessment of the data that can be used to tell the story of the state DOT and be used to inform transportation policy decisions in the future.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

Refinement and Evaluation of Policies, Procedures and Requirements Related to the National-Level Asset Management Performance Measures (PM2 Measures)

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

Evaluate and assess the existing national-level performance measure requirements for asset management at the state level to determine applicability and usability of PM measures in asset management decision making. As appropriate, provide recommendations and refinement of the performance measures for better use an application.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

1. Evaluate current federal PM2 measures, both pavement condition measures and bridge measures, for performance thresholds, and overall performance measure with respect to: Consistency, Usefulness, and Alignment.

2. Identify and address in detail specific challenges for each condition measure for consistency, including thresholds. For example, determine if wheel path cracking considerations could be revised to provide more consistent results across pavement types (e.g. composite, concrete) and pavement widths (e.g. <12 ft.) 3. Provide recommendations to improve existing measures and/or identify metrics that better reflect conditions enhance decision-making taking into account not only the assessment of current and future condition but also their implications in economic analyses of long-term maintenance and rehabilitation.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

Improved TAM Approaches for Aligning Network and Project Level Decisions Across Asset Classes

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$350,000

Research Period

24 months

Description

State departments of transportation (DOT) and other transportation agencies face a range of challenges in determining how best to invest in their existing pavements, bridges, and other physical assets, and in projecting what the impact of those investments will be over time. Addressing these challenges requires considering both specific planned or potential investments at a project or asset level, as well as overall expenditures and conditions for systems of assets – that is, at a network level. Evaluating assets at both the project and network levels is consistent with best practice in Transportation Asset Management (TAM), and is required by recent Federal regulations in performance and asset management. For instance, 23 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 490 requires state DOTs to set network-level performance targets for future pavement and bridge conditions for the National Highway System (NHS) based on expected funding. Also, 23 CFR Part 515 requires state DOTs to develop TAM plans for their NHS pavements and bridges including financial plans and investment strategies, implying further project-level analysis.

As transportation agencies are using their existing pavement and bridge management systems, they are finding that no one management system supports the full range of network and project-level analyses required to meet the demands of TAM practice and Federal regulations. Thus, to support TAM and meet Federal requirements agencies typically rely on multiple systems and approaches with different data requirements, analytical approaches and underlying assumptions. A common approach is to use pavement and bridge management systems to predict network-level conditions, typically projecting conditions out 10 or more years in the future, while making near-term project level decisions in a more decentralized manner using mix of expert judgment and heuristic approaches. In concept the network-level analysis can be used to guide project-level decisions, and specific project plans can often be incorporated in a network level analysis. However, in practice the network and project-level analyses are often performed largely independently from one another incorporating different data, factors and constraints.

The approach of using multiple approaches for network and project level asset analyses has numerous pitfalls. These include, but are not limited to: generating unrealistic predictions of network level conditions; developing projects that do not reflect optimal asset lifecycle plans developed at a network level; waste of staff time through inefficient business processes or duplication of effort; and omission of critical assets from one or more analyses (e.g., for lack of data or a dedicated management system). Guidance is needed to assist agencies in making better use of existing systems to integrate network and project-level analysis, as well as to define a framework for future asset management tools that will enable integrated network and project-level analyses across multiple asset classes, potentially using multi-objective approaches.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The goal of this research is two-fold: to provide guidance on how transportation agencies can best use existing management systems and tools to integrate network and project-level analysis and provide a framework for an improve asset modeling approach that better integrates the project and network levels incorporating multiple asset types and consideration of multiple objectives. The research is intended to be of immediate value in helping transportation agencies better comply with Federal requirements to set performance targets and develop asset management plans. Also, it will help agencies to extend asset management approaches to additional systems and assets, besides the NHS pavement and bridge assets addressed through the Federal regulations. In addition, the research will help define improved approaches for asset management models for public agencies, researchers and system developers to use in developing the next generation of asset management systems.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Risk Analysis and Vulnerability Practices Across Transportation Agencies

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$150,000

Research Period

12 months

Description

Research is needed addressing risk analysis/vulnerability quantification and application to multiple transportation modes for purposes of scenario planning at MPO and DOT levels. There is significant variability across agencies with regards to how the agencies analyze risk and their practices for assessing vulnerability. Even basic elements such as methods that agencies use to collect data are not consistent across agencies, further complicating any potential analysis.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This research should:
• Identify pertinent data sources, data types, as well as relevant collection and analysis methods employed by transit agencies.
• Provide a synthesis of examples or State of the Practice applications for MPOs/DOTs.
• Outline communication strategies to the relevant decision-makers.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

System Level Asset Valuation

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

There are standard practices used internationally for incorporating asset valuation into an organization’s financial statements that have not been adopted in the US. These are important to asset management to support long-term financial planning, leading to improved financial sustainability. Improved practices in asset valuation will allow agencies to use financial valuation and acknowledge that sustainability is not only about maintaining financial capacity (cash) and infrastructure capital (condition).


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The objectives of this research are to examine methods for evaluation of system assets. Thorough research should:
• Identify international practices and determine how they can be applied in the US
• Better marry engineering and accounting in financial planning
• Demonstrate benefits through a case study (may be fictional)


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Aligning the Organization for TAM

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Enterprise-wide asset management is a multi-disciplinary, cross-functional, inter-departmental and partner-dependent undertaking that forms the basis of how an organization does business. How does an asset owner ensure that all of those involved in successful asset management are aligned, taking responsibility, and contributing to the effort?


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The focus of this research is to support a scan tour or peer exchange addressing organizational alignment for TAM. This falls into three distinct but equally necessary categories: a review of previous knowledge, a inter-agency gathering to assess differing organizational models and policies to TAM, and finally a report or summary of the findings.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Organizational and Cultural Factors for Successful TAM Implementation

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

State departments of transportation (DOTs) and other transportation agencies are challenged to deliver greater transportation asset management (TAM) performance – even as available resources are increasingly constrained. Agencies recognize that established business processes, organizational structures, technical methodologies, tools, and systems must adapt to meet these challenges. Agencies must increasingly pursue tailored solutions that consider a variety of perspectives and factors – and work in a more collaborative fashion. At the same time, decision processes are more open and desired outcomes are more likely to be measured and reported. Taken together, these dynamics elevate the challenge of effectively implementing TAM for DOTs and other government transportation agencies. As a result, the state of the practice is uneven: TAM is adopted in some organizations but not others, and in some organizations to a greater degree than others.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Research is needed addressing the question: “What are the organizational/cultural factors that were in place before and/or during implementation that created a successful TAM program?” Develop a guidebook to convey lessons learned. Key point: must use an organizational development or similar consulting firm. Not the usual suspects!


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Transportation Asset Management and Overall Transportation Management

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$150,000

Research Period

12-18 months

Description

The relationships between TAM and economic development, safety, mobility, etc. need to be better understood. This will help activities such and the connectivity between long range plans, transportation improvement programs, and transportation asset management plans. Research and evaluation of agency practice and results is required to consider how these agency activities and expenditures relate back to an agency’s goals and objectives. For example, how do system-wide goals for level of service and condition translate into individual project selection and asset management application? This research will focus on understanding the TAM relationships to broader transportation goals and how best to make the connections stronger from planning, programming, project delivery, to maintenance/operations.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This research will focus on understanding TAM’s relationship to other transportation goals such as economic development, safety, environmental sustainability, mobility, and livability. Two products are sought through this research: 1) Framework for understanding the relationships between TAM and broad transportation goals. 2) Guidance on how to ensure TAM connectivity to broad transportation goals throughout the transportation decision-making cycle.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Organizational Models for Successful Transportation Asset Management Programs

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$125,000

Research Period

12 months

Description

As TAM tools and techniques advance, organizational capabilities in transportation agencies have to advance also to realize the benefits of asset management. Many organizational models and role types exist for TAM programs. People are an integral ingredient for realizing the positive outcomes that are possible with asset management. Transportation agencies today could use assistance in improving organizational capacity to adopt asset management benefits.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This research will focus on understanding successful organizational models for TAM program so that guidance can be provided on how to improve organizational capacities. Two products are sought through this research: 1) Understanding of current organizational models for TAM programs 2) Catalog of possible organizational models for TAM programs that transportation agencies could consider for improving TAM capabilities.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Forecasting the Financial Needs for Transportation Assets – LCC Model

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$150,000

Research Period

18 months

Description

With the current financial state and shrinkage of resources, there is an urgent need to know what is the value and future cost of maintaining assets. Maintaining assets have an obvious value, but there is a cost associated with both choosing to maintain assets, as well as a cost associated with choosing not to do so. Attempting to determine the expected long-term costs of maintaining an asset, as well as the predicted value of having a well-maintained asset, is a considerable challenge for a transportation agency.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The objective for this research is to examine the costs and value associated with maintaining assets, and then to develop a usable model for forecasting the cost and value. Such a model must include, but not be limited to:
• A framework for quantitatively assessing the value of an asset that has been properly maintained.
• A tool for calculating the long-term costs of maintaining an asset, in line with industry standards for safety and reliability.
In addition to developing the model, the research should also establish guidance targeted at helping practitioners conduct forecasting analyses and communicate the results.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Improving Asset Inventory and Reducing Lifecycle Costs through Improved Asset Tracking

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$120,000

Research Period

12 months

Description

Well set up asset inventory is essential to reduce long-term costs in any agency. By tracking assets, lifecycle costs should be able to be reduced. An accurate asset inventory is a key element in meeting MAP-21 requirements. With the emergence of asset tagging and tracking technologies it is imperative to have a common standard in how these technologies should be developed and applied to support asset lifecycle management. Which of these technologies is the most efficient at reducing costs is still an open question.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The proposed research will:
• Evaluate various technologies for tagging and tracking assets and capturing asset history. Each proposed tracking technology should be evaluated for various factors, such as cost, ease of use, efficacy, and time required to implement.
• Create a standard for transportation asset tagging and tracking that can be used intermodally and across agencies.
• Develop a business case to demonstrate the lifecycle savings that can be achieved by transportation entities. This case study may be fictional if a suitable real-world example cannot be identified due to the new nature of the technologies.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Guidance for Tracking Critical Data Items to Reduce Asset Lifecycle Costs and Support Treatment Decisions

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$300,000

Research Period

18 months

Description

Due to legislative mandates and advances in organizational practices, transportation planning agencies have engaged in intensive data collection activities. The resulting data has been used, to some extent, by these agencies to guide their resource allocation decisions for their infrastructure assets. However, there still remains vast amounts of underutilized data that, if leveraged appropriately, could be used by planning agencies to improve the cost-effectiveness of their infrastructure maintenance and preservation activities. As a result, it is important that planning agencies gain better insights regarding the types of data frequently available within infrastructure management systems that can be used to reduce the life-cycle costs of an agency’s assets.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The proposed research will:

  • Identify and classify data items required to inform the maintenance and rehabilitation of different asset types.
  • Determine the degree of relevance/criticality of select data items towards treatment decisions.
  • Identify the level of detail required for asset management decisions at both the project and network level.
  • Construct sensitivity analyses between data elements and infrastructure performance to explore the relationships that exist between them. This would also justify which data items are worth investing more resources into in order to mitigate uncertainties in developing long-term infrastructure preservation plans.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Methodology to Perform Dynamic Changes to Treatment Plans when Delays Occur

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$500,000

Research Period

36 months

Description

Treatment selection is related to treatment timing. An asset that is identified to have a particular treatment but the treatment, but the treatment is delayed can be improperly treated if the treatment is not reevaluated. If a more dynamic method for selection could be applied at the right time, the end results could be greatly improved, but a concrete methodology to accomplish this is lacking.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The proposed research will first develop a methodology that will allow dynamic changes to treatment plans. Then, the research must test the methodology, as well as identify and quantify cost savings benefits of using the methodology or tool.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Comparison of ISO Framework and Legislative Requirements for Asset Management Plan

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$400,000

Research Period

24 months

Description

Existing standards have been developed by ISO and are being used by various groups. Now there is federal legislature with requirements for asset management plans. The goal of this research is to establish relationships between these existing standards and the legislature requirements.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Identify linkage between ISO standards and MAP-21 TAMP requirements. Identify gaps or inconsistencies and propose solutions. The proposed solutions may include guidelines for agencies, research needs, modification to the standards, or agency specific standards that address agency specific needs.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Guidance in the Development of Communication Plans and Asset Management

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$400,000

Research Period

24 months

Description

Agencies have a need to tell a better story. The utility of a well-thought out story, called a marketing plan, is to convert the non-believing decision makers and public. A well-conceived plan must translate the technical issues to something that resonates with public. For example, Ohio has marketing toolbox for continuous improvement with tools designed specifically for internal and external users. Although Asset Management is the right thing to do, the public still does not rally behind the cause. A possible solution is heavy branding and thorough communications plans.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The focus of this research can be divided into three main categories. Firstly, prior information must be collected and organized. This is accomplished through:
• Case studies and examples of best practice
• Creating a synthesis of state’s best practices
The next step is to build tools that allow for better asset management marketing, such as:
• Communication, sales, and/or a media science application to help craft a way to tell the story
• Creating a marketing plan that can be used to educate and train
• Training to Speak a language that all can understand
• Communicating the secondary benefits of TAM
Finally, follow-ups of the methods must be conducted to measure efficacy. This could include examining:
• How effective are the marketing and communication? Is the message being received?
• How has public perception changed?


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Infrastructure Needs for Autonomous Vehicles

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$100,000

Research Period

18 months

Description

Autonomous vehicles, colloquially referred to as self-driving cars, have a large potential to impact transportation networks in the near future. Semi-autonomous vehicles with various degrees of autonomy are already a reality. The industry is still a relatively nascent one, and therefore several large questions still exist. The expected capabilities and limitations of these vehicles are not yet established, nor is a timeline for implementation. The capacities and speed of implementation of autonomous vehicles are also greatly affected by the infrastructure on which they operate.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The objectives of this research are to quantify the expected abilities of autonomous vehicles, to establish an expected timeline of integration within the greater transportation networks, and to examine what infrastructure changes are most beneficial for autonomous vehicles.
The capacities of autonomous vehicles are not yet quantified. The research should:
• Determine what types of roads are suitable for such vehicles.
• Examine safety for both drivers/passengers, and other users of the roadways, such as pedestrians and cyclists.
• Explore limitations, such as fog or extreme conditions.
• Establish a timeline for adoption. Since the technology is expected to change rapidly, current capabilities will change.
The infrastructure requirements for autonomous vehicles are greatly dependent on the capabilities of the vehicles. Nevertheless, certain changes can be expected to improve the safety and usefulness of the vehicles, such as:
• Repainting roadways to help the vehicles operate.
• Installing RFID that could communicate with the vehicles directly.
• Determining what challenges would face a mixed-stream road of autonomous vehicles and vehicles under driver operation.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

How to Recruit, Train and Maintain a TAM Staff

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Transportation Asset Management (TAM) brings with it new fields and emerging technologies. These innovations require employees to have a different skill set then what was previously necessary. Co-ordination cross departments and silos is mandatory. Effective data management and effective use of systems and analytics is essential. With all of these new employee skills being critical to effective operations, transit agencies face the difficulty of recruiting, training, and maintaining a TAM staff.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The primary focus of this research is, at a most basic level, to help agencies strengthen their work force. This should be accomplished by researching areas where:
• Agencies lack a comprehensive list of necessary skills for a given position
• Agencies lack a comprehensive list of which positions are most critical to keep fully staffed. In an era of shrinking budgets, effectively prioritizing hiring decisions is crucial.
• There is a gap in knowledge regarding existing certifications.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Guideline for Cross-Jurisdictional Asset Data Integration

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$200,000

Research Period

18-24 months

Description

Data-driven analytics are increasing critical to the success of any transportation agency. The recent NHS expansion impact on data collection, collaboration, and by extension, the entire decision making process. This leaves a fundamental question: How do we help agencies comply with FHWA requirements to manage across jurisdictions.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The research should focus of two primary areas of focus. The researchers must develop a guidebook for data integration across jurisdictional lines, as well as review the existing standards for civil data. This could include projects such as Civil Integrated Management (CIM) and the researchers must document the positive and negative ramifications of the various standards.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Synthesis on Advancing Technology in Asset Data Collection

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$50,000

Research Period

6-12 months

Description

Emerging technologies hold the promise of transforming asset data collection for transportation asset management. Applications of these technologies include the use of drones for inspections, LiDAR field data collection, continuous monitoring of real-time sensor data, and more. Research is needed to address the adoption and practical application of these technologies and the rapid pace of technological advancement.

Emerging technologies hold the promise of transforming asset data collection for transportation asset management such as the use of drones for inspections, LiDAR field data collection, continuous monitoring of real-time sensor data, and more. While the technology has been transforming, MAP-21 and the Fast Act jump started at many agencies in attaining an inventory of infrastructure assets and transportation data. At the same time, accessibility and affordability to collect high volumes of asset inventory data, such as LiDAR point cloud data, present the problem of how agencies can visualize and manage such large amounts of data and integrate the many layers for each transportation asset management plan. Now that the need for such data is federally recognized, further research is needed to understand what the latest technologies for asset analysis can offer an agency as well as how frequently that information needs to be generated.

Photo imagery

Cell phones / Collector Apps

Vehicle, AAV, or drone

More specific to TAM and data collection than synthesis 508

Includes an aspect of data management to prepare data for use in appropriate TAM systems.


Background

Emerging technologies hold the promise of transforming asset data collection for transportation asset management such as the use of drones for inspections, LiDAR field data collection, continuous monitoring of real-time sensor data, and more. While the technology has been transforming, MAP-21 and the Fast Act jump started at many agencies in attaining an inventory of infrastructure assets and transportation data. At the same time, accessibility and affordability to collect high volumes of asset inventory data, such as LiDAR point cloud data, present the problem of how agencies can visualize and manage such large amounts of data and integrate the many layers for each transportation asset management plan. Now that the need for such data is federally recognized, further research is needed to understand what the latest technologies for asset analysis can offer an agency as well as how frequently that information needs generated.


Literature Search Summary

Synthesis 508 - Data Governance


Objectives

Research is needed in the following areas:
● Address the adoption and practical application of these technologies and the rapid pace of technological advancement.
● What level of extraction detail and frequency interval is needed to support TAM at both the state and local levels and how can the condition assessment be applied to the performance measures of both pavement and non-pavement assets?
● Further investigate what tools are capable of visualizing asset extraction layers, as well as presenting such data to all stakeholders in powerful GIS formats with standardized TAM graphics for universal interpretation.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

AI and Deterioration Modeling

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

AI is coming – are we ready? With the MAP-21/FAST Act legislation, and the renewed emphasis on Transportation Asset Management Plans (TAMPs), projections made by management systems will come under increasing scrutiny as agency executive leadership is asked to make large scale funding decisions based on these projections. This scrutiny as well as the inherent complications in predictive modeling of asset deterioration, presents an opportunity for the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in this type of analysis.

AI is becoming ubiquitous in the realm of automation and pattern recognition and shows promise in improving predictive modeling for infrastructure managed by highway agencies. Because data collected over time is especially valuable for deterioration modeling, it is very important for agencies to start collecting the right data, and putting in place the right quality control, as early as possible so that this data is ready for immediate use as more research into AI techniques for predictive modeling is conducted.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This research project would aim to develop a Primer or Guidance document to help agencies tasked with managing infrastructure (including pavement and bridges) to assess their current data, data collection processes, and data needs to best position them to be able to take advantage of burgeoning artificial intelligence techniques to develop increasingly accurate predictive models regarding their infrastructure.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Guide to Promote the Use of Performance-Based Decision Making in Maintenance

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

This field has not yet been completed.

Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Real Option Methodology for Risk Assessment in Asset Management

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

A number of approaches are commonly used to manage risk, including conducting visual inspections of existing infrastructure, using design standards with conservative safety factors for new infrastructure, and applying best practices for minimizing risks of project cost and schedule overruns. Research is needed to determine how to build on existing practices to better assess the risks to transportation assets, better quantify consequences of different risks, and better prioritize investments explicitly acknowledging uncertainty in future events.

R = Σ pi × Ci

Risk (R) is generally quantified with the equation above. It is essentially a value for the expected outcome returns of a decision weighted by the probability (p) of each consequence (C) of event i. How do we calculate R if neither p nor C is certain? Do current methods address this effectively?

Investment decisions are widely made using discounted cash flows (DCF). It is assumed, that given a certain decision made in Year 0, Costs and Benefits can be assumed for a number of years to come, i.e. C is known and p is assumed 1 for all i. If the project is considered risky, the discount rate is increased accordingly. However, defining the future in- and outflow of cash with such deterministic certainty is unrealistic. Not only is the consequence (C) uncertain, but also their occurrence. This is because infrastructure is often affected by stochastically occurring events.

We can ignore the uncertainty by using expected values. Imposing an assumed expected value will nevertheless almost certainly lead to arriving at a wrong risk estimation (see figure X). This is called the “flaw of averages” (Savage, 2012). The error due to the “flaw of averages” exponentiates when systems are non-linear because outputs using expected inputs do not equal expected outputs. Ultimately, it can be said that ignoring the uncertainty and the consequent existence of a distribution instead of a deterministic expected value, is a fallacy.

Discrepancies between the forecast and actual costs of road projects, Source: (de Neufville and Scholtes, 2011)

Another approach to compensate for increased risk is overdesigning infrastructure. This reduces the probability of failure to negligent values, but may lead to infrastructure being overly expensive or redundant. This also ignores the fact that infrastructure owners are not passive, but actively observe their condition and relevant external factors and trends that affect the condition level of the infrastructure. Based on this, the fundamental assumptions of DCF do not seem appropriate.


Background

The Real Option method allows infrastructure owners to evaluate the advantage of options that an infrastructure manager has over time. As time passes, a manager will have the ability to intervene as as an object may deteriorate at a faster rate than expected. Likewise, a manager may postpone a planned intervention if the condition is better than expected. In addition to the option to defer, a manager may have the option to expand or contract the infrastructure or the infrastructure network, as well as to shut it down temporarily, abandon it, grow it or switch it (de Neufville and Scholtes, 2011).

The options provide an owner with the flexibility adapting the infrastructure to uncertain future needs. Owners, thus, neither under-, nor overinvest and consequently minimize the risks of their decisions. The external factors affecting risk include weather events, condition development, system demands, funding and other critical variables. The methodology proposes a way to systematically analyse and define these uncertainties and make predictions taking the defined uncertainty fully into consideration.

Real option valuation is known using binomial lattices (a form of decision trees) and/or Brownian motion random walk algorithms. Infrastructure life-time net benefits can also be calculated by simulating the uncertainty using continuous Monte Carlo simulations. Using different stakeholders’ costs of different design alternatives and management strategies, the costs can be calculated over a large sample of potential futures. The methodology is able to address multiple levels of risk and weight them as necessary and thus make multi-objective, cross-asset investment decisions under uncertainty to best support the national goals identified in 23 USC 150(b).

The ultimate objective is to provide the decision-maker with tools that add value to the decision-making process and improve the robustness of the infrastructure network as a whole. In that sense, novel approaches for the evaluation of risk will be sought to capture the stochastic nature of interdependent infrastructure. A graph theory approach to evaluate criticality of network node failure as shown by Buldyrev and colleagues (2010) may prove interesting for the evaluation of consequences, and thus the real option value for the infrastructure, simulated by network programming methods.

The application and evaluation of a large sample of data and data simulations is computationally challenging. Furthermore, decision-making tools are urged to be simple and understandable. As big data may improve predictability and performance of models, strong emphasis must be laid on the usability of such models. In this project, it is suggested that particular focus will be on addressing these challenges with the outlook of combining big data and the model’s user interface design.

References:
Buldyrev, S. V., R. Parshani, G. Paul, H. E. Stanley and S. Havlin (2010) Catastrophic cascade of failures in interdependent networks, Nature, 464, 1025-1028.
de Neufville, R. and S. Scholtes (2011) Flexibility in Engineering Design, Engineering Systems, MIT Press, ISBN 978-0262297332.
Savage, S. (2012) The Flaw of Averages: Why we underestimate Risk in the face of Uncertainty, Wiley, ISBN 978-1118073759.
Prof. Dr. Rade Hajdin, July 2019


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The ultimate objective is to provide the decision-maker with tools that add value to the decision-making process and improve the robustness of the infrastructure network as a whole. In that sense, novel approaches for the evaluation of risk will be sought to capture the stochastic nature of interdependent infrastructure. A graph theory approach to evaluate criticality of network node failure as shown by Buldyrev and colleagues (2010) may prove interesting for the evaluation of consequences, and thus the real option value for the infrastructure, simulated by network programming methods.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Conduct Regional and National Peer Exchanges

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Continue to deliver TAM peer exchanges at the regional and national levels.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Synthesize Best Practices for Internal Staff Development

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Synthesize best practices for workforce development and training in order to enhance the capabilities of a TAM team/staff or attract internal staff to become involved in TAM program/implementation.


Background

Synthesize best practices for workforce development and training in order to enhance the capabilities of a TAM team/staff or attract internal staff to become involved in TAM program/implementation.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Create Catalog of Condition Assessment Protocols

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Document and provide examples of condition assessments for all types of assets.


Background

This field has not yet been completed.

Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Document and provide examples of condition assessments for all types of assets.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Develop TAM Big Data Case Studies

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Create case studies addressing noteworthy applications of big data analytics to TAM.


Background

Create case studies addressing noteworthy applications of big data analytics to TAM.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

CC - Improve Asset Performance by Bundling Capital Projects

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Research effective corridor planning strategies that promote sustainable capital asset improvements that impact asset class performance and other performance areas.


Background

Research effective corridor planning strategies that promote sustainable capital asset improvements that impact asset class performance and other performance areas.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Incorporate Change Management into TAM Implementation

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

This field has not yet been completed.

Research Period

This field has not yet been completed.

Description

Develop a framework, recommended actions, and synthesis of noteworthy practices for agencies to use in incorporating change management strategies in TAM practice.


Background

Develop a framework, recommended actions, and synthesis of noteworthy practices for agencies to use in incorporating change management strategies in TAM practice.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

This field has not yet been completed.

Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Develop Approaches for Corridor Planning and Allocation

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$350,000

Research Period

18 months

Description

• Asset conditions are typically determined currently in separate silos - leading to asset treatments that are applied on varied schedules by asset (pavement, bridges, culverts) even over the same corridor.
• Significant resources may be misallocated on treatments applied at the wrong time due to lack of coordinated corridor planning.
• Corridor planning can organize the asset treatments — while also looking at environmental issues, congestion, and safety
• There may be other issues such as operation needs in a corridor as well.
o “Project delivery” can be achieved more efficiently because projects are organized into a corridor delivery strategy. Projects can be peeled off as funding is available
o Public can be engaged all at once instead of multiple times for multiple projects.
o Minimize contractor costs


Background

• Asset conditions are typically determined currently in separate silos - leading to asset treatments that are applied on varied schedules by asset (pavement, bridges, culverts) even over the same corridor.
• Significant resources may be misallocated on treatments applied at the wrong time due to lack of coordinated corridor planning.
• Corridor planning can organize the asset treatments — while also looking at environmental issues, congestion, and safety
• There may be other issues such as operation needs in a corridor as well.
o “Project delivery” can be achieved more efficiently because projects are organized into a corridor delivery strategy. Projects can be peeled off as funding is available
o Public can be engaged all at once instead of multiple times for multiple projects.
o Minimize contractor costs


Literature Search Summary

• Boadi, Richard S; Amekudzi, Adjo A. Risk-Based Corridor Asset Management: Applying Multiattribute Utility Theory to Manage Multiple Assets. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Issue 2354, 2013, pp 99–106 https://trid.trb.org/view/1241970
• Anderson, Scott A; Rivers, Benjamin S. Corridor Management: A Means to Elevate Understanding of Geotechnical Impacts on System Performance. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Issue 2349, 2013, pp 9-15 https://trid.trb.org/view/1241789


Objectives

Develop guidance on an asset management corridor planning process to prioritize and schedule project delivery for cost effectiveness while also considering mobility/accessibility issues, drainage, and more.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Engage Stakeholders in TAM

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$300,000

Research Period

18-24 months

Description

Agencies have made progress in implementing TAM within their agencies. The impact of TAM will be much greater if stakeholders are engaged as a part of the decision-making and TAM approaches were collaborative for given geographic areas.


Background

Agencies have made progress in implementing TAM within their agencies. The impact of TAM will be much greater if stakeholders are engaged as a part of the decision-making and TAM approaches were collaborative for given geographic areas.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

Develop communication tools and methodologies for engaging stakeholders in TAM program activities such as strategies development, performance management implementation, and budget development.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Support Data Governance Implementation

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$150,000

Research Period

12 months

Description

• Recent NCHRP research products have documented data governance techniques and provided tools for agencies to assess their current data governance practices and identify strategies for improvement.
• NCHRP 08-115 (publication pending) included data governance as one of several foundational activities for improving use of data and information for transportation asset management. An NCHRP 20-44 proposal is in process to conduct pilot implementations of the guidance and assessment tool developed through that project, and produce supplemental guidance materials based on the pilots.
• Many DOTs are implementing data governance – through establishing governance bodies, defining data stewardship roles and putting standard processes in place. The AASHTO Data Management and Analytics Committee has established a Chief Data Officer (CDO) peer group to enable ongoing sharing of data governance practices.
• This project would build on the established base of prior and ongoing work on data governance. It would focus specifically on providing specific examples or models that can be applied to help advance asset management practice through data governance.


Background

• Recent NCHRP research products have documented data governance techniques and provided tools for agencies to assess their current data governance practices and identify strategies for improvement.
• NCHRP 08-115 (publication pending) included data governance as one of several foundational activities for improving use of data and information for transportation asset management. An NCHRP 20-44 proposal is in process to conduct pilot implementations of the guidance and assessment tool developed through that project, and produce supplemental guidance materials based on the pilots.
• Many DOTs are implementing data governance – through establishing governance bodies, defining data stewardship roles and putting standard processes in place. The AASHTO Data Management and Analytics Committee has established a Chief Data Officer (CDO) peer group to enable ongoing sharing of data governance practices.
• This project would build on the established base of prior and ongoing work on data governance. It would focus specifically on providing specific examples or models that can be applied to help advance asset management practice through data governance.


Literature Search Summary

• Synthesis 508 Data Management and Governance Practices
• NCHRP Report 920 Management and Use of Data for Transportation Performance Management: Guide for Practitioners
• NCHRP Report 814 Data to Support Transportation Agency Business Needs
• NCHRP 20-44 (12) Building Capacity for Self-Assessment of Data Effectiveness for Agency Business Needs (new project)
• NCHRP 08-115 Guidebook for Data and Information Systems for Transportation Asset Management


Objectives

Provide support to implement the data governance practices and processes recommended through NCHRP 08-115, Guidebook for Data and Information Systems for Transportation Asset Management.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Assess Benefits Realized from TAM

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$250,000

Research Period

18 months

Description

• It’s difficult to communicate the value of an asset management approach to the public.
• In many cases agency leaders and stakeholders, including the public, may not see discernable benefits from TAM, reducing support for a preservation-focused investment strategy and/or improved systems and data required to support a TAM approach.
• Research has been performed in the past regarding how to calculate the return on investment (ROI) of TAM systems and how to communicate the value of preservation. Also, private sector entities use a separate set of approaches for evaluating the benefits of providing transportation as a concession.
• Additional research is needed to quantify the benefits of TAM generally, and incorporate consideration of other factors such as sustainability, equity, resilience, etc.


Background

• It’s difficult to communicate the value of an asset management approach to the public.
• In many cases agency leaders and stakeholders, including the public, may not see discernable benefits from TAM, reducing support for a preservation-focused investment strategy and/or improved systems and data required to support a TAM approach.
• Research has been performed in the past regarding how to calculate the return on investment (ROI) of TAM systems and how to communicate the value of preservation. Also, private sector entities use a separate set of approaches for evaluating the benefits of providing transportation as a concession.
• Additional research is needed to quantify the benefits of TAM generally, and incorporate consideration of other factors such as sustainability, equity, resilience, etc.


Literature Search Summary

• NCHRP Synthesis 330, Public Benefits of Highway System Preservation and Maintenance
• NCHRP Report 742, Communicating the Value of Preservation: A Playbook
• NCHRP Report 866, Return on Investment in Transportation Asset Management Systems and Practices
• TCRP Report 206, Guidance for Calculating the Return on Investment in Transit State of Good Repair


Objectives

Develop a framework and guidance for calculating and communicating the overall benefit of improved asset management approaches to transportation agencies, transportation system users, and society of improved asset management approaches. The framework should address monetized benefits, as well as issues such as equity, sustainability, and resilience. Illustrate use of the framework and examples through a set of pilot studies of U.S. agencies.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

This field has not yet been completed.

Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

This field has not yet been completed.

Develop Methods to Allow Agencies to Incorporate Quantitative Risk Assessment at Project and Network Level

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$450,000

Research Period

12-18 months

Description

Managing risk is a critical component of asset management. On a day-to-day basis transportation asset managers spend much of their time responding to or mitigating a large number of risks, which may range from external events that damage transportation infrastructure to unplanned changes to budget or workloads resulting from unexpected events. Various recent and on-going research efforts aim to improve approaches for risk management for transportation agencies. However, most of these efforts treat risk management as a high-level activity. Further research is needed to develop quantitative, repeatable approaches at the appropriate staff level, to assessing and identifying the highest priority risks transportation agencies face in managing physical assets. This project aims to develop such approaches to assess risks (e.g., financial, strategic, operational, political, environmental, technological, social justice risks) and incorporate them into life cycle analysis and planning efforts.


Background

Managing risk is a critical component of asset management. On a day-to-day basis transportation asset managers spend much of their time responding to or mitigating a large number of risks, which may range from external events that damage transportation infrastructure to unplanned changes to budget or workloads resulting from unexpected events. Various recent and on-going research efforts aim to improve approaches for risk management for transportation agencies. However, most of these efforts treat risk management as a high-level activity. Further research is needed to develop quantitative, repeatable approaches at the appropriate staff level, to assessing and identifying the highest priority risks transportation agencies face in managing physical assets. This project aims to develop such approaches to assess risks (e.g., financial, strategic, operational, political, environmental, technological, social justice risks) and incorporate them into life cycle analysis and planning efforts.


Literature Search Summary

Risk management has been studied quite extensively in the transportation sector. Risk management encompasses four major steps: Risk identification, risk assessment, risk mitigation, and continuous updating of results. Risk assessment focuses on determining the magnitude of risk, which is directly proportional to the likelihood and consequences of an event to occur. Risk assessment has been a major area of study in pavement and bridge management efforts. In recent decades, the focus has shifted from assessing risk in single networks towards more holistic risk assessment approaches.

Between 2012 and 2013, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published a five-part report series on Risk Based Asset Management. These reports focus on: (1) Overview of risk management, (2) Managing risk at different levels, (3) Strategic risk management (risks to agency objectives), (4) Managing risk to critical assets, and (5) Managing external threats such as climate change and extreme weather risks. These reports played an important role in introducing risk management concepts into asset management efforts. In 2016, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) published the Guide for Enterprise Risk Management. In this Guide, risk management is defined as “the systematic application of policies, procedures, and practices to the identification and management of uncertainty or variability on achievement of agency objectives.” In addition, the Guide introduces four levels at which risks need to be managed: Strategic, Program, Project, and Activity levels. Enterprise Risk Management is defined as management of risks at all levels. Other research projects (recently completed, active, or pending) in this area include:
• NCHRP 08-113: Integrating Effective Transportation Performance, Risk, and Asset Management Practices
• NCHRP 08-118: Risk Assessment Techniques for Transportation Asset Management
• NCHRP 20-44(02): Implementation of the AASHTO Guide for Enterprise Risk Management
• NCHRP 20-123(04): Development of a Risk Management Strategic Plan and a Research Roadmap
• NCHRP 08-129: Incorporating Resilience Concepts and Strategies in Transportation Planning
• NCHRP 23-09: Scoping Study to Develop the Basis for a Highway Standard to Conduct an All-Hazards Risk and Resilience Analysis.

Managing risk at program (or network) and project levels is particularly important to achieve desired performance levels and to improve resilience of a transportation system. While existing research efforts in this area are highly significant, there is a need for developing more practical and repeatable risk assessment calculation methods for project and network level risks. This proposed study will build on these recent efforts, particularly NCHRP 23-09, and serve as the next phase in risk assessment and management.


Objectives

The objectives of this research are to:
• Generate risk identification techniques to determine high risk threats at project and network levels,
• Develop quantitative, repeatable approaches for assessing likelihood and consequences for these threats,
• Develop visual, interactive characterization methods (e.g., dashboards) to reflect an agency’s level of risk and the effectiveness of proposed mitigation actions,
• Allow risk and resilience to be on par with traditional performance measures.

High risk threats to be studied include, but are not limited to, extreme events (e.g., earthquakes, fires, hurricanes, avalanches, tornadoes), asset failure (structural and operational), financial, strategic, political, environmental (e.g., sea level rise, flooding), technological, and social justice risks.

The final deliverables could include guidebook with a spreadsheet or a framework for assessing high risk threats and incorporating the results into TAM efforts. The guidebook should feature a comprehensive review of existing literature and current practice. It should present a standard definition of resilience as well as step-by-step instructions to develop models, methods, and metrics for estimating resilience of highway systems to high risk threats. Pilot studies should be conducted with select agencies to test the guidance and calculation procedures.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

While existing reporting mechanisms allow agencies to see the parts of their network that are in good and poor condition, risks associated with different threats and the impact of failure are not reported as an explicit performance measure. Competing design documents, financial implications, legal concerns, maintenance practices, focus on building new capacity rather than managing existing infrastructure, and other factors that affect decision making procedures may counter-act risk-based TAM practices. Issues related to social justice and equity, and consequences of failures make risk-based TAM even more important. Creating harmony in the TAM decision making space in consideration of risk and resilience represents an urgent need. A practical, quantitative, and repeatable risk assessment process could play a major role in addressing this need.


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

Evaluate Federal Measures and Metrics for Pavements

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$500,000

Research Period

12-18 months

Description

The Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21) transportation bill established federal regulations that require each State Department of Transportation (DOT) to develop a Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP), and implement Performance Management. These regulations require all DOTs to utilize nationally defined performance measures for pavements on the National Highway System (NHS). These nationally defined performance measures (referred as PM2 hereafter) are aimed at providing nationally consistent metrics for DOTs to measure condition, establish targets, assess progress toward targets, and report on condition and performance. Furthermore, Federal measures provide the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) the ability to better communicate a national performance story and to more reliably assess the impacts of Federal funding investments.
State DOTs are expected to use the information and data generated from these Federal measures to inform their transportation planning and programming decisions. However, State DOTs are finding discrepancies between pavement conditions from PM2 measures as compared to their internal, state-developed measures. This discrepancy hampers the adoption of the PM2 pavement measures as the primary input into condition summary reporting and pavement investment prioritization and decision-making. In other words, State DOTs do not have confidence in the Federal measures, primarily because these measures cannot be used to inform decision-making processes such as investment decisions. Furthermore, the resulting differences between state metric-determined and federal metric-determined network conditions creates confusion among the public, senior executive staff, and legislative bodies, along with non-DOT owners of NHS assets.
As mentioned before, FHWA needs to collect consistent Federal measures across all State DOTs to assess the impact of Federal funding investment at the national level. However, State DOTs have been collecting pavement performance data for decades and used this data to inform their pavement management systems and processes to address specific needs. Typically, the data collection processes cover state-owned pavements and not only NHS pavements, which brings another layer of inconsistency. For this reason, there is a need for more flexible metrics that can be aligned to performance measures currently used by State DOTs and support decision-making processes such as investment decisions.


Background

The Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21) transportation bill established federal regulations that require each State Department of Transportation (DOT) to develop a Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP), and implement Performance Management. These regulations require all DOTs to utilize nationally defined performance measures for pavements on the National Highway System (NHS). These nationally defined performance measures (referred as PM2 hereafter) are aimed at providing nationally consistent metrics for DOTs to measure condition, establish targets, assess progress toward targets, and report on condition and performance. Furthermore, Federal measures provide the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) the ability to better communicate a national performance story and to more reliably assess the impacts of Federal funding investments.
State DOTs are expected to use the information and data generated from these Federal measures to inform their transportation planning and programming decisions. However, State DOTs are finding discrepancies between pavement conditions from PM2 measures as compared to their internal, state-developed measures. This discrepancy hampers the adoption of the PM2 pavement measures as the primary input into condition summary reporting and pavement investment prioritization and decision-making. In other words, State DOTs do not have confidence in the Federal measures, primarily because these measures cannot be used to inform decision-making processes such as investment decisions. Furthermore, the resulting differences between state metric-determined and federal metric-determined network conditions creates confusion among the public, senior executive staff, and legislative bodies, along with non-DOT owners of NHS assets.
As mentioned before, FHWA needs to collect consistent Federal measures across all State DOTs to assess the impact of Federal funding investment at the national level. However, State DOTs have been collecting pavement performance data for decades and used this data to inform their pavement management systems and processes to address specific needs. Typically, the data collection processes cover state-owned pavements and not only NHS pavements, which brings another layer of inconsistency. For this reason, there is a need for more flexible metrics that can be aligned to performance measures currently used by State DOTs and support decision-making processes such as investment decisions.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The objective of this research is to:
1. Evaluate current federal pavement condition measures (Ride Quality, Rutting, Faulting, and Cracking), performance thresholds, and overall performance measure with respect to:
a. Consistency – across various pavement types, network designations, and lane configurations
b. Usefulness – in network-level pavement condition summary and asset management decision-making, prioritization, and forecasts; and
c. Alignment – with state established pavement condition metrics

2. Provide recommendations to improve existing measures and/or identify metrics that better reflect pavement failure mechanisms and enhance decision-making taking into account not
only the assessment of current and future condition but also their implications in economic analyses of long-term maintenance and rehabilitation. Evaluate pavement leading indicators as an alternative to the current version of the PM2.

3. Identify and address in detail specific challenges for each condition measure (Ride Quality, Rutting, Faulting, and Cracking) for consistency, including thresholds. For example, determine if wheel path cracking considerations could be revised to provide more consistent results across pavement types (e.g. composite, concrete) and pavement widths (e.g. <12 ft.) 4. Evaluate structural capacity indicators for potential consideration as a Federal measure.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

Because DOTs are only two years into implementing the pavement performance measures and metrics, the urgency is great to make sure the measures in use are as meaningful, consistent and implementable as possible. Currently, the performance measures have not achieved widespread use as the primary performance criteria for decision-making, leading to two sets of metrics being used by many agencies. In addition, DOTs must make performance predictions and justifications based on the federal performance measures. Making any changes to the measures as soon as possible will allow DOTs to build up datasets on which to base predictions of future performance.
Potential benefits to improving the federal pavement performance measures and metrics include:
• Metrics that better define pavement failure mechanisms and therefore condition
• Metrics that result in more consistent results across pavement types and pavement widths
• Broader adoption of the measures by DOTs as part of decision-making criteria
• Less confusion among the public, senior executive staff, and legislative bodies, along with non-DOT owners of NHS assets by having one set of metrics instead of two (federal and state-specific)


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes

Causes and Effects of Transportation Data Variability

Research Candidate Statement

Funding

$400,000

Research Period

12 months

Description

• State departments of transportation (DOTs) and metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) across the United States are required to establish performance targets as part of their asset management efforts. The target- setting requirements for transportation performance management (PM2) of pavement and bridge condition generally require agencies to consider three factors; the measured condition of the assets, expected deterioration over time and project level accomplishments. The measured condition of the asset is the ultimate measure of progress and an effective way for agencies to demonstrate that they are making progress as required by federal regulations.
• Research assessing the consistency of National Bridge Inventory (NBI) condition metrics has found variability between individual inspectors when inspecting “control bridges” for study. In other words, there is the potential for any given bridge inspector to assess the current condition of same bridge differently. This variability means that the conditions of bridge could improve in the absence of a project just by having a different inspector interpret the field condition differently. A similar potential exists for pavement condition assessments. This demonstrates the potential inconsistencies due to human interaction, but the same could be true of technologies if applied or calibrated differently across agencies.
• Pavement and bridge conditions rely on assessment methods that are subject to variability from one assessment to the next and from one assessor or one technology utilization to the next. This variability may occur in the absence of projects or significant field deterioration. This research project would attempt to evaluate the impact of condition assessment variability on agency wide target setting required for asset management.


Background

• State departments of transportation (DOTs) and metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) across the United States are required to establish performance targets as part of their asset management efforts. The target- setting requirements for transportation performance management (PM2) of pavement and bridge condition generally require agencies to consider three factors; the measured condition of the assets, expected deterioration over time and project level accomplishments. The measured condition of the asset is the ultimate measure of progress and an effective way for agencies to demonstrate that they are making progress as required by federal regulations.
• Research assessing the consistency of National Bridge Inventory (NBI) condition metrics has found variability between individual inspectors when inspecting “control bridges” for study. In other words, there is the potential for any given bridge inspector to assess the current condition of same bridge differently. This variability means that the conditions of bridge could improve in the absence of a project just by having a different inspector interpret the field condition differently. A similar potential exists for pavement condition assessments. This demonstrates the potential inconsistencies due to human interaction, but the same could be true of technologies if applied or calibrated differently across agencies.
• Pavement and bridge conditions rely on assessment methods that are subject to variability from one assessment to the next and from one assessor or one technology utilization to the next. This variability may occur in the absence of projects or significant field deterioration. This research project would attempt to evaluate the impact of condition assessment variability on agency wide target setting required for asset management.


Literature Search Summary

This field has not yet been completed.

Objectives

The outcome from this effort will benefit quality assurance (QA) methods for data collection and inspection efforts, quantify the variability and sensitivity in target setting for DOTs, and help budget planning for asset inconsistencies.


Urgency and Potential Benefits

• To be completed at 9/9 research workshop


Primary Author

This field has not yet been completed.

Implementation Considerations

This field has not yet been completed.

Notes