This page collects active and recently completed research projects. The set of programmed, but not yet active, projects are also included for reference. Please use this form to submit a programmed or active project for inclusion in the RMS. We would love to hear your suggestions and feedback, so please Provide Site Feedback for anything that can be enhanced or improved!
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Programmed Projects

Project
Funding: $500,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: January 2021
End date: February 2022
Objectives

The objectives of this research are to develop guidance promoting the use of performance-based management strategies in maintenance and to present the resulting information in a format that is easily accessible to the maintenance community.


Project
Funding: $450,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: February 2021
End date: November 2020
Objectives

With the original project being completed in early 2020, the project panel has focused on both implementation of TAM Guide III and determining additional needs to make the TAM Guide III better based on the original literature research and review. An extensive literature search was conducted as a part of the original NCHRP project phase one work and the results generally incorporated and addressed in the new TAM Guide III; however, because of funding limitations, not all of the desired changes, updates, and enhancements could be addressed. Based on those limitations, the objective of this research is to provide further enhancements and content to the TAM Guide III.


Project
Funding: $500,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: February 2021
End date: January 2023
Objectives

Based on these changing conditions, the objective of this research is to investigate the needs and benefits from incorporating TSMO assets in TAMPs. The study will develop a guide for state DOTs to facilitate the inclusion of TSMO in TAMP without disrupting the established and on-going planning process.


Project
Funding: $400,000
Funding Source: Other CRP
Start date: April 2021
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop a “playbook” with standards, specifications, and process flows to help airport operators with the accurate and timely delivery of new and replacement asset information/meta data to key airport stakeholders responsible for tracking and maintaining airport assets.



Active Projects

Project
Funding: $50,000
Funding Source: Other CRP
Start date: January 2019
End date: January 2020
Objectives

The objective of this research is to provide a state by state summary of pertinent laws and practices related to achieving a state of good repair for transportation assets and include a summary of decisions and the experiences of transportation agencies.

At a minimum, the following questions should be considered:
How are the assets being used?
When does it become prudent to close a portion of a transportation asset because there are insufficient financial resources to keep the asset safely open to the public?
When an asset repeatedly fails inspections and budgetary restraints persist, how is the decision made to close or shut down the asset?
If federal funds were used to build the failing structure, when does the funding agency weigh in on closure?
Does a closure, or approval of a closure, constitute a federal action requiring compliance with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)?
Will federal funds need to be refunded?
When the public is not allowed to travel over an asset that has been closed, is there exposure for failure to provide equal protection of the laws or failure to comply with civil rights protections?
What governance practices are in use?
What lessons can be drawn from current experience?


Project
Funding: $300,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: June 2019
End date: December 2020
Objectives

The objectives of this research are to (1) estimate the current and future effect of dynamic CAV technologies on roadway and TSMO asset maintenance programs; (2) develop guidance on existing and proposed measureable standards associated with roadway and TSMO asset maintenance for preventive, reactive, and emerging maintenance needs; and (3) identify the associated resource and workforce development needs.


Project
Funding: $45,000
Funding Source: Synthesis
Start date: September 2019
End date: December 2020
Objectives

The objective of this synthesis is to document DOT collaboration with MPOs relative to target setting, investment decisions, and performance monitoring of pavement and bridge assets for performance-based planning and programming. The synthesis will focus on DOT practices to initiate and facilitate collaboration with MPOs.


Project
Funding: $666,617
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: June 2018
End date: January 2021
Objectives

The objective of this research is to provide transportation agencies with practical guidance, recommendations, and successful implementation practices for

1. Integrating performance, risk, and asset management at transportation agencies;

2. Identifying, evaluating, and selecting appropriate management frameworks; and

3. Recruiting, training, and retaining human capital to support asset management and related functions.


Project
Funding: $500,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: April 2019
End date: April 2021
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop guidance coupled with one or more prototypical, analytical model(s) to support life-cycle planning and decision-making that applies life-cycle cost analysis as a component of a system-wide transportation asset management program. This guidance and associated analytical model(s) will apply quantitative asset-level, project-level, and network-level inputs to demonstrate methods for calculating life-cycle costs associated with alternative scenarios while taking into account preservation, rehabilitation, replacement, maintenance, and potential risk mitigation actions on a range of highway assets. To the degree possible, costs should reflect condition, risk and uncertainty, mobility, safety, and any other quantifiable aspect of transportation system performance. Although this research is targeted to state DOT highway assets within the overall transportation network, the research should also identify additional research necessary to expand the process to include other modes.


Project
Funding: $530,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: February 2019
End date: April 2021
Objectives

The objectives of this research are to (1) assess the state of transportation agency practices regarding use of targets in their transportation performance management (TPM) decision making, monitoring performance results, and as necessary adjusting management strategies and desired target levels; and (2) develop resources that agency practitioners can use to implement and maintain a process of monitoring performance and making management decisions based on comparisons of targets and observed system performance. Such resources could include, for example, guidebooks, web-based publications, prototypical planning scenarios, interactive computational tools, and visualization tools.


Project
Funding: $500,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: April 2020
End date: July 2021
Objectives

The objective of this research is to evaluate the business case for BIM in the United States by quantifying how adopting enterprise-wide BIM systems can provide increased agency efficiencies and foster advanced, comprehensive lifecycle management of enterprise assets.

The data for this research shall be gathered using domestic and international examples, with the findings targeted for the U.S. market and DOT stakeholders.


Project
Funding: $45,000
Funding Source: Synthesis
Start date: October 2020
End date: July 2021
Objectives

The objective of this synthesis is to document current state DOT practice and experience regarding collecting and ensuring the accuracy of element level data. The synthesis will also examine how DOTs are using the data from inspection reports.

Information to be gathered includes (but is not limited to):
• Practices for collecting element level data (e.g., collection software, nondestructive evaluation methods);
• Practices and methods for ensuring the accuracy of the data collected;
• DOT business processes that use element level data (e.g., project scoping, maintenance, bridge asset management modeling and analyses, performance measurement and reporting); and
• Aspects of DOT bridge management systems that use element level data (e.g., deterioration models, action types, action costs, decision rules, performance indices).


Project
Funding: $700,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: May 2019
End date: August 2021
Objectives

The objectives of this research for NCHRP 02-25 are the following:
1. To produce a roadmap of effective human capital strategies for state DOTs, identifying critical areas necessary in the future to attract, retain, and develop a sustainable, qualified transportation design, construction, and maintenance workforce;
2. To identify trends, policies, and processes critical for developing and maintaining an adaptive organizational framework that will attract, retain, and develop a qualified workforce beyond 2030; and
3. To prepare an evidence-based guide that transportation industry organizations may use when developing and establishing an effective human capital program for a qualified workforce into 2030 and beyond.
The scope will be limited to the transportation workforce in design, construction, and maintenance.


Project
Funding: $45,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: November 2020
End date: August 2021
Objectives

The objective of this synthesis is to document the various technologies used by DOTs to inspect highway infrastructure during construction and maintenance of assets.

Information to be gathered includes (but is not limited to):
• The technologies used for inspection of new and existing highway infrastructure assets (e.g., geospatial technologies, mobile software applications, nondestructive evaluation, remote sensing and monitoring);
• The different methods used to assess the viability, efficiencies, and return on investment (ROI) of inspection technologies;
• How information from these assessments is being used (e.g., for construction project management, to allocate resources, to determine condition of the asset).


Project
Funding: $600,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: July 2020
End date: November 2021
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop a guidebook that state transportation agencies and others can use for calculation and communication of the value of transportation assets, and for selecting valuation methods to be used in transportation asset management. This guidebook, applicable to transit as well as highway modes, should (1) present a standardized terminology for discussing asset value, (2) describe currently accepted valuation methods, (3) describe the merits and shortcomings of these methods to produce measures of asset value useful for communicating among stakeholders and making resource allocation decisions, and (4) present advice on determining which valuation methods will be most useful in communication and decision-making for a particular agency.

The guidebook shall include at least the following components:
• Terminology and definitions of asset value (a) determined by generally accepted accounting principles, considering initial acquisition or construction costs and depreciation, (b) based on engineering estimates to replace the asset (considering age, condition, obsolescence, and the like), (c) based on estimates of revenues that could be produced from the assets if they were operated as a business venture, (d) based on socio-economic returns to a region’s economy and wellbeing, or (e) other relevant definitions;
• Current best practices for computation and presentation of each of the definitions of value listed above, presented in a manner that can be used by transportation agencies;
• Analysis of the advantages and shortcomings of the value methods as factors to be considered in system-level resource allocation decisions, for example, investment planning, maintenance budgeting, lifecycle management, and presentations for public discussion;
• Identification and description of needs for data and information for value computations;
• A capability-maturity model that an agency can use to characterize its valuation practices and needs and strategies for improvement;
• Advice on incorporating valuation estimates into the agency’s asset management practices.
NCHRP anticipates that the guidebook may be published by AASHTO. It should be compatible with print and web-based versions of AASHTO’s Transportation Asset Management Guide.


Project
Funding: $250,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: July 2020
End date: January 2022
Objectives

The objective of this research is to provide a scoping study for a transportation framework for all-hazards risk and resilience analysis of transportation assets. The scoping study must accomplish the following objectives:

1. Develop a comprehensive and consistent set of risk- and resilience-related terminology for transportation agency use; and
2. Provide a research roadmap for developing a framework for a quantitative all-hazards risk and resilience analysis of transportation assets, with its associated tools, and guidance on its application.

Accomplishment of the project objective(s) will require at least the following four tasks.


Project
Funding: $350,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: September 2020
End date: February 2022
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop a guide for state DOTs and other transportation agencies on incorporating maintenance costs in a risk-based TAMP, including but not limited to the following:

1. A detailed presentation of procedures for identifying, collecting, and managing required data;

2. Using life-cycle planning tools and techniques to demonstrate financial requirements and cost-effectiveness of maintenance activities and preservation programs and the potential change in costs and liabilities associated with deferring these actions;

3. Formulating strategies that identify how to invest available funds over the next 10 years (as required by the TAMP) using life-cycle and benefit-cost analyses (and other applicable tools and techniques) to measure tradeoffs between capital and maintenance activities in alternative investment scenarios; and

4. Designing components of a financial plan showing anticipated revenues and planned investments in capital and maintenance costs for the next 10 years.


Project
Funding: $350,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: November 2020
End date: May 2022
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop resources for state DOTs and other transportation organizations to help them explain the value of investing in resilience throughout the life cycle of planning, engineering, design, operations, construction, and maintenance activities.

The resources should provide tools for state DOTs to (1) build the business case for investing in resilience strategies and (2) develop communication strategies to make the public and stakeholders aware of the importance of resilience as part of the state DOT's overall mission. This project should consider the diversity of resiliency issues among state DOTs and agencies.

Accomplishment of the project objective will require at least the following tasks.


Project
Funding: $800,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
End date: July 2022
Objectives

The objectives of this project are (1) to develop a playbook to support emergency management program review and development for state transportation agencies and (2) to develop and execute a deployment strategy to familiarize the affected transportation agencies of every state with the playbook and supporting emergency management materials. The playbook and related products and activities should encompass state DOTs, public transportation systems, and other transportation agencies under state control or influence (i.e., state transportation agencies).


Project
Funding: $500,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: June 2020
End date: September 2022
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop and disseminate a practitioner-ready guidebook for state DOTs that is focused on methods for the target-setting component of transportation performance management. The guidebook will provide information on selecting effective methods that use both qualitative and quantitative sources to establish performance targets. The guidebook will also address how to re-evaluate targets, taking into account unforeseen changes impacting the transportation system, performance data, and performance reporting requirements.


Project
Funding: $370,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: August 2020
End date: February 2023
Objectives

The objectives of this research are to (1) develop guidelines for the applications of RFID and wireless technologies for highway construction and infrastructure asset management and (2) plan and conduct a workshop to introduce the proposed guidelines to an audience of DOT staff and other stakeholders. At the minimum, the research shall include readiness assessment of RFID and wireless technologies for different applications and implementation requirements.



Recent Projects

Project
Funding: $125,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: August 2018
End date: December 2019
Objectives

The NCHRP 20-24 Task 124 Performance Management Reporting Peer Exchange was held on Tuesday October 16th and Wednesday October 17th, 2018 at the Hall of States in Washington D.C. Representatives from 18 state DOTS, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) attended. Participants were subject matter experts in performance management, pavement management and communications. The goal of the Peer Exchange was to help DOTs develop a toolkit and strategies for communicating the difference between state and Federal pavement performance in a consistent narrative. While this Peer Exchange focused on pavement performance, the process can be used as a framework to develop strategies to help states communicate other performance measures. A toolkit and summary are available in addition to the final report.



Project
Funding: $300,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
End date: July 2019
Objectives

This report provides practical guidance to transportation agencies to help improve their use of data for performance management. Recent federal legislation has highlighted the importance of data utilization in performance management. The guidance focuses on six areas of the data life-cycle allowing for analysis on decisions and to identify opportunities for improvement. The purpose of this report is to allow for agencies to enhance their insight into their performance and to boost results.



Project
Funding: $500,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
End date: May 2019
Objectives

This report presents guidance and examples for selection of peer groups to ensure that benchmarking is effectively applied to enhance transportation system performance. The report includes practical guidance on how transportation agencies can undertake benchmarking to improve system performance management practices and highlights applications of the guidance in two specific components of system performance, for active (that is, non-motorized) transportation and environmental impact.



Project
Funding: $45,000
Funding Source: Synthesis
End date: November 2019
Objectives

This synthesis report documents agency practices, challenges, and successes in conducting automated pavement condition surveys. The report also includes three case examples that provide additional information on agency practices for conducting automated pavement surveys.



Project
Funding: $500,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: February 2017
End date: March 2020
Objectives

The objective of this research was to develop guidance (tools, procedures, and policies) for identifying, evaluating, and communicating multimodal transportation investment right-sizing scenarios. Although agencies are generally equipped to assess investment strategies, sufficient guidance is not readily available on how to identify and assess right-sizing or disinvestment scenarios in ways that clearly explain decisions associated with resource tradeoffs and constraints and how these decisions impact overall system resilience and sustainability. Outcomes of this research should enable agencies to answer questions such as, “Why are we spending more or less on (or eliminating) a given asset; and why is that a good decision given the functional requirements of the broader transportation system”? In response to this objective, the product of this research should be guidance for practitioners to implement and communicate right-sizing methods, applicable to individual projects and system-wide investment strategies. This guidance also defines and identifies additional components that can or should be encompassed by the concept of “right-sizing” as well as present a set of practical approaches for measuring and evaluating performance outcomes across a broad set of investment options.



Project
Funding: $350,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: May 2016
End date: January 2019
Objectives

This report presents guidance for state departments of transportation (DOTs) and other agencies conducting financial analyses and developing financial plans to support efficient and effective management of the agency’s transportation assets.



Project
Funding: $500,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: July 2016
End date: March 2019
Background

Moving Ahead with Progress for the 21st Century (MAP-21) and Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, call for risk and performance-based asset management for bridges and pavements and encourage state transportation agencies to develop and implement transportation asset management strategies for all assets within the right-of-way. This study contributes to the body of knowledge going beyond the initial steps of Geotechnical Asset Management (GAM) and places emphasis on incorporating geotechnical assets into transportation asset management. The objective of this research is to produce a manual for developing and implementing a geotechnical asset management program. The manual provides plans and tools for a consistent management program that is flexible enough to meet the needs of agencies having varied levels of maturity as they integrate the geotechnical assets into their overall asset management programs.


Project
Funding: $500,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: July 2016
End date: March 2019
Background

Moving Ahead with Progress for the 21st Century (MAP-21) and Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, call for risk and performance-based asset management for bridges and pavements and encourage state transportation agencies to develop and implement transportation asset management strategies for all assets within the right-of-way. This study contributes to the body of knowledge going beyond the initial steps of Geotechnical Asset Management (GAM) and places emphasis on incorporating geotechnical assets into transportation asset management. The objective of this research is to produce a manual for developing and implementing a geotechnical asset management program. The manual provides plans and tools for a consistent management program that is flexible enough to meet the needs of agencies having varied levels of maturity as they integrate the geotechnical assets into their overall asset management programs.


Project
Funding: $398,300
Funding Source:
End date: March 2019
Objectives

This report extends and implements the results of NCHRP Report 806: Cross-Asset Resource Allocation and the Impact on System Performance. Case studies were used to illustrate key issues in implementing a cross-asset resource allocation approach, and the lessons learned were then used to improve the guidance and tools developed in NCHRP Report 806.



Project
Funding: $45,000
Funding Source: Synthesis
End date: May 2020
Objectives

The report is intended to help transportation agencies with building data sets and tools that support the evaluation of damage to assets associated with emergency events and to illustrate methodologies that are being used to integrate these risks into asset investment decisions.



Project
Funding: $400,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: August 2018
End date: January 2021
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop a guidebook presenting principles, organizational strategies, governance mechanisms, and practical examples for improving management of the processes for collecting data, developing useful information, and providing that information for decision making about management of the transportation system assets. The guidebook should assist practitioners addressing at least the following topics:

• Conducting agency self-assessments of information management practices (for example, a maturity model and leading-practices descriptions), using existing tools and techniques to the extent these are available;
• Exploring transferrable data and information management practices from a variety of sources—DOTs and others not necessarily restricted to domestic transportation agencies—that have demonstrated effective asset management;
• Considering how to incorporate evolving technologies and state-of-the-art management practices, for example by providing agencies with management scenarios and exemplary data models;
• Establishing organizational structure, personnel capabilities requirements, outsourcing policies and practices, and governance policies and procedures to support effective provision of asset management information;
• Assessing options for staff development, outsourcing, and other strategies for ensuring the agency has appropriate capability and capacity for asset information management; and
• Developing a management roadmap for implementing unified, enterprise-wide governance of asset data and information, from initial project development through transportation asset and performance management.


Background

State departments of transportation (DOTs) and other transportation agencies produce, exchange, manage, and use substantial quantities of data and information for project development and subsequent management of the system assets for which they are responsible. These agencies devote considerable resources to data collection and storage and often face challenges such as duplicating effort or gaps in data collected by various organizational units; ensuring that data sources are well documented and information is current; and providing the people responsible for planning, design, construction, and operations and maintenance of system assets with access to reliable current information for decision making.

Continuing rapid evolution of data and information technologies presents challenges as agencies seek to ensure that the transportation system delivers high performance and the agency functions effectively and efficiently. Remote sensing, Lidar, GIS, 3-D graphic displays, and virtual reality (to name a few of the newer developments) are supplementing or replacing data acquisition and information management practices once based on physical measurements and storage and display in large-format print media. Many agencies must deal with legacy data while avoiding obsolescence in their management practices. Typically fragmented DOT business practices and the decades-long processes of asset development and life-cycle service have produced disparate data sets that are poorly suited to effective long-term system asset and performance management.

Efforts are being made to address these problems. The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) for example has developed a set of Core Data Principles (https://data.transportation.org/aashto-core-data-principles/) for transportation data. Ongoing research sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) will provide an analysis of the civil integrated management (CIM) data practices. Guidance produced by NCHRP, AASHTO, and FHWA addresses transportation asset management, information management, and data self-assessment (data value and data management)—see Special Note B. However, additional research is needed to provide agencies with guidance on opportunities for improving their information acquisition and management; data governance and maintenance workflows; human and business-support resources needed for data and information management; and procedures for assuring that reliable information for effective asset management is available when and where it is needed.


Project
Funding: $100,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: April 2019
End date: January 2021
Objectives

The objectives of this research are to document (1) the state of practice within state DOTs as they implement these new requirements and (2) the impacts of implementation to date on asset condition, safety performance and the investment of federal transit funds. This research will provide states with information that will help them evaluate the effectiveness of their efforts to date and refine or adjust their implementation.


Background

On July 16, 2016 FTA issued the final transit asset management rule and an associated final notice regarding NTD reporting. State DOTs and their subrecipients have specific obligations under the rule and notice. On August 11, 2016, FTA issued the public transportation safety program final rule. This final rule in combination with the yet to be released final rule on public transportation agency safety plans and the final national public transportation safety plan, will create new obligations for State DOTs and their subrecipients. The Transit Asset Management (TAM) Plan rule and the Transit Agency Safety Plan rule are aimed at facilitating improvement in transit asset condition and safety performance.


Project
Funding: $400,000
Funding Source: Other CRP
End date: August 2019
Objectives

This guide to building information modeling (BIM) applications for airports presents guidance for evaluating the business case of applying and implementing BIM.



Project
Funding: $800,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
End date: July 2022
Objectives

The objectives of this project are (1) to develop a playbook to support emergency management program review and development for state transportation agencies and (2) to develop and execute a deployment strategy to familiarize the affected transportation agencies of every state with the playbook and supporting emergency management materials. The playbook and related products and activities should encompass state DOTs, public transportation systems, and other transportation agencies under state control or influence (i.e., state transportation agencies).


Background

There is a need for a strategy-driven, actionable guide—a playbook—that, with incidental implementation support, will help emergent and part-time transportation emergency managers to understand, plan, and implement an emergency preparedness program that fits their agency’s needs, capabilities, and challenges. Such a playbook will serve as a simple, practical, and comprehensive emergency preparedness program development guide for transportation emergency managers; be generally applicable to all transportation emergency operations centers (EOCs); and be consistent with ICS/NIMS/HSEEP doctrine. A transportation-specific playbook will help close the gap in transportation emergency preparedness and enable quicker and more effective uptake of valuable scenario-based training and exercising tools that help organizations apply prerequisite planning and program development.

Translating strategy from the playbook to the real world (how to do it) is complex, as states vary in how they organize their activities. This project will develop and execute a strategy to effectively bridge the gap between all-hazards emergency management research and state transportation agency practice to improve state transportation agency responses over a broad continuum of emergencies affecting the nation’s travelers, economy, and infrastructure.


Project
Funding: $100,000
Funding Source: Other CRP
Start date: February 2016
End date: September 2017
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop a recommended Second Edition Guide for use by state transportation agencies in planning and developing their organizational functions, roles, and responsibilities for emergency response within the all-hazards context of the National Incident Management System (NIMS). The Second Edition Guide should be suitable for adoption by the AASHTO Special Committee on Transportation Security and Emergency Management (SCOTSEM). The updated Guide should reference the latest state of the practice and guidance in emergency management. This effort would include guidance from USDOT, FHWA, AASHTO, FEMA, TSA, DHS, and TRB on emergency management from a state-level DOT perspective. For example, information such as found in the National Disaster Response Framework; how response impacts short- to long-term recovery; pre-disaster planning for post disaster recovery; and efforts to include resilience and sustainability should all be looked at and addressed in the document.


Background

The 2010 Guide replaces a 2002 document, A Guide to Updating Highway Emergency Response Plans for Terrorist Incidents (available on the AASHTO website at http://scotsem.transportation.org/Documents/guide-ResponsePlans.pdf), which was released following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the subsequent anthrax attacks.
In addition to the introduction, background, and institutional context for emergency response planning, the 2010 Guide has two major sections:
Sections 3-5: Design an Emergency Preparedness Program—this contains a program-level review of the all-hazards approach to emergency management, which will help transportation agencies assess their plans and identify areas needing improvement.
Section 6: Resource Guide—this contains guidance on organizational, staffing, and position decisions; decision-making sequences; a full emergency response matrix; and a purpose and supporting resources for action reference matrix.


Project
Funding: $0
Funding Source:
End date: March 2018
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop a recommended second edition of Security 101 for use by transportation personnel without a security background whose work requires them to address, perform, or supervise security or infrastructure protection activities as a part of their overall job responsibilities. The updated Security 101 should be suitable for adoption by the AASHTO Special Committee on Transportation Security and Emergency Management (SCOTSEM). The updated Security 101 should reference the latest practice and guidance in infrastructure protection encompassing cyber and physical security. This update would include guidance from USDOT, FHWA, AASHTO, APTA, FTA, FEMA, TSA, DHS, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and TRB. The work will update fundamental definitions for: (1) surface transportation physical and cyber security; (2) all-hazards planning; and (3) resilience of transportation operations in the post 9-11 environment. Emphasis will be placed upon expanding the Security 101 products to capture the current practice and guidance in relation to recently developed:
• Risk management and assessment processes
• Standards, guidance, and tools
• Technologies for transportation infrastructure protection
• Staffing models and deployment methods
• Design build and structural improvement criteria
• All-hazards resource acquisition, budgeting, and allocation
• Security and emergency management implementation methods and procedures
• Legal issues associated with security management
• Employee training requirements


Background

Since publication of Security 101, there have been both significant changes and a substantial increase in knowledge about surface transportation security. The decade-long effort to improve the state of security and emergency management practice in the transportation industry has produced new strategies, programs, and ways of doing business that have increased the security of our transportation systems as well as ensured their resiliency. Research is needed to update Security 101 to reflect the changed circumstances and to include cyber-related information.


Project
Funding: $400,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
End date: July 2018
Objectives

The objective of this research was to develop guidance for transportation decision makers to incorporate freight, transit, and incident response stakeholders into the integrated corridor management (ICM) process. ICM can range from simple to sophisticated and may continually change. The research will make use of existing FHWA and SHRP2 efforts, incorporating these and other efforts as needed. The guidance should address a broad range of operational and efficiency issues, including documented characteristics and potential approaches related to implementation of the ICM strategies.




Project
Funding: $250,000
Funding Source:
End date: December 2018
Objectives

The objective of this research is to develop a guide to bus transit service reliability. The guide will include a toolbox of resources that may be used to diagnose and manage bus transit service reliability and will describe benefits, costs, and outcomes of potential policies, strategies, and actions.



Project
Funding: $45,000
Funding Source: Synthesis
Start date: October 2019
End date: May 2021

Project
Funding: $300,000
Funding Source: Other CRP
End date: June 2019
Background

This guide helps agencies to incorporate equity into their transportation plans through a five-step framework for conducting equity analyses. The five steps are: identifying populations for analysis, identifying needs and concerns, measure impacts of proposed agency activity, determine if impacts are disparate or have adverse effects, and develop strategies to avoid and mitigate inequities. Though intended for Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), this guide is also applicable to transit agencies, state DOTs, and other transportation agencies that seek to address equity in their plans, programs, and policies.


Background

NCHRP Synthesis 546: Use of Weigh-in-Motion Data for Pavement, Bridge, Weight Enforcement, and Freight Logistics Applications documents how DOTs incorporate weigh-in-motion data into such applications as bridge and pavement design and management, load ratings, weight enforcement support, and freight planning and logistics.


Project
Funding: $400,000
Funding Source: Full NCHRP
Start date: April 2018
End date: October 2020
Objectives

The objectives of this research were the following:
1. To develop a framework for identifying, collecting, aggregating, analyzing, and disseminating data from emerging public and private transportation technologies.
2. To outline a process for using this framework to help decision-makers incorporate data from emerging technologies into transportation planning and policy.


Background

The expanding deployment of emerging transportation technologies, including connected vehicles (CVs), automated vehicles (AVs), shared mobility, mobility on demand, and activities associated with smart cities and communities, has increased the need and demand for improved management of associated data. While existing transportation databases have sometimes been curated and analyzed for specific project purposes, improved collaboration is needed to inform state and local agencies of lessons learned and best practices, which often produce ”big data” at magnitudes not previously seen.

To demonstrate and build on these emerging technologies, a wide range of institutions, both public and private, have initiated and invested in major pilot programs. These efforts are also supported by U.S. DOT through several federal initiatives such as the following:

• CV Pilot Deployment Program,
• The Smart City Challenge,
• The Advanced Transportation and Congestion Management Technologies Deployment Program of FHWA

As these efforts continue to expand, the amount and quality of data surrounding the application of emerging technologies is also expanding. In response, an improved collaborative approach to data analytics has the potential to improve our ability to address transportation planning and policy questions critical to informed and effective decision-making at state and local public agencies.

State and local transportation agencies are eager to learn from the experiences of early adopters of changing and emerging transportation technologies. Formulating a framework that establishes specific procedures for identifying, collecting, aggregating, analyzing, and disseminating data should significantly contribute to effective transportation decision-making.